NOSTRADAMUS, ASTROLOGY AND THE BIBLE
SUBSTUDY "WORLD WAR II"
Prophete rechts - Prophete links - War Nostradamus wirklich Scharlatan und Betrüger?
(Nostradamus Scharlatan?)
(C. Loog, Der Reichswart #50, Berlin, December 12, 1940)
- T.W.M. van Berkel -

Nederlandse versie
 
Headline of Loog's article in Der Reichswart, #50, 1940

In an enclosure to a report about the state of affairs in Germany in the astrological field, published on Ulrich Maichle's website Die Nostradamus-Propaganda der Nazis 1939-1942, some remarks by Carl Loog, made in a full-page article (in fact: a letter to the editors) in number 50 of volume 1940 of the national-socialist weekly Der Reichswart, were criticized. In this article, Loog's letter is discussed.
Loog is the author of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (Pfullingen in Württemberg, 1921 [1920]), in which he wrote about quatrain 03-57 that, according to Nostradamus, in 1939, a crisis would occur in England and at the same time one in Poland. In Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (Berlin, 1922 [1921]), dr. Hans-Hermann Kritzinger quoted Loog's comment on quatrain 03-57. The year 1939, one of the scarce years mentioned in this book, was in bold print.
In connection with Loog's comment on quatrain 03-57, the German attack on Poland in September 1939 became linked to this quatrain. Because of this link, dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels, the German minister of Propaganda (1933-1945), got the idea to use the Centuries and/or Century-comments for psychological warfare.[1]
In #50 of volume 1940 of the national-socialist weekly Der Reichswart, a letter, written by Loog, was published under the title Prophete rechts - Prophete links - War Nostradamus wirklich Scharlatan und Betrüger?. On this website, its title is abbreviated into Nostradamus Scharlatan?. In this letter, Loog replied to Prophete rechts, Prophete links..., a contribution by Kurt Fervers, published in Der Reichswart #45, November 7, 1940. Fervers had a quite sceptical attitude towards prophecies in general and notably towards the Centuries. His remarks in connection with Nostradamus as a person were highly antisemetic.[2] 
Nostradamus Scharlatan? is divided into three parts. In the first part, Loog refuted critics on Nostradamus which in his eyes were unjust. In the part, entitled Die Voraussagen, he discussed some features of the key he had derived from the Centuries, a key which enabled him to arrange the quatrains in their original order. He also compared Fervers' remarks on some quatrains with comments he himself had given. In the part, entitled "Ein Kapitän von Groß-Deutschland", he discussed quatrains which according to him were fulfilled in 1940 in a way which matched his comment in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus.
The question is if, prior to its publication, the editorial staff of Der Reichswart shortened Loog's letter, deleted some passages of changed some, whether or not ordered by the Censorship section of the Ministry of Propaganda to do so. According to prof. dr. dr. E. Noelle-Neumann, who in June 1940 wrote a propagandistic article on Nostradamus for the Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung, the Censorship section did not constantly control the editorial staffs. If editorial staffs had the opinion that some passages had to be verified, it was up to them to consult the Censorship section.[3] Since further information is lacking, it is assumed in this article that Loog's letter has been published completely. Probably, the editorial staff of Der Reichswart divided Loog's letter into parts and added a general title and two paragraph titles. The paragraph title "Ein Kapitän von Groß-Deutschland", which precedes Loog's discussion of the connection between quatrain 05-51 and the circumstances in Europe in 1940, is right in the middle of Loog's comment on this quatrain. It is not likely that Loog himself in this way would have inserted a paragraph title.

 

Unjustified critics on Nostradamus
In the first part of Nostradamus Scharlatan? Loog argued that mistakes have been attributed to Nostradamus, which in fact have to be attributed to commentators and readers. He warned against the use of Die erstaunlichen Bücher des Grossen Artztes, Sehers und Schicksals-Propheten Nostradamus in’s Deutsche übertragen und dem Verständnisse aufgeschlossen (Stuttgart,1850); the first German translation of the Centuries, made by Edouard Roesch, the book to which Fervers referred in Prophete rechts, Prophete links... According to Loog, Roesch's translation was that poor, that those who based their comments upon it, easily could make serious errors.
Loog also wrote that in times of war, many people had a sense for mysticism which they strongly rejected in times of peace. At times of war, they would start to look in the Centuries for predictions which in one way or another would correspond with their circumstances. Loog stated that the mistakes these people made, can not be attributed to Nostradamus. In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, he made a similar remark[4] Loog also wrote that it was dangerous for serious Century-scholars to occupy themselves with the Centuries, because they might become superstitious.
Further, Loog noted that some commentators perverted, shortened or enlarged a quatrain until it fitted their wishes, as if they were Procrustes.[5] For those who did not believe prophecy, this was a proof that prophecy was a ridiculous matter. Loog stated that not Nostradamus, but the commentators were responsible for this approach.
Loog refuted the statement that Nostradamus was a charlatan and an imposter because he was a Jew of the third generation. According to Loog, such a statement was not sufficient.

 

Loogs key to the Centuries
In Die Voraussagen, Loog described the way in which Nostradamus, according to him, compiled the Centuries. Loog wrote that the disorder of the quatrains was the result of the confusion Nostradamus deliberately caused by a.o. the use of an astronomic system. 
In connection with the key he derived from the Centuries, Loog described astronomic features which he had not discussed in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus or Prophezeiungen – eine Erwiderung, a reply to critics of notably his compatriot Count Carl Ludwig Friedrich Otto von Klinckowstroem on the key he derived from the Centuries, published in the January issue of volume 1922 of the monthly Psychische Studien.[6] According to Loog, the remark in the Epistle to Henry II that the prophecies were compiled by means of the chain in which the time order is locked, is an allusion to an astronomic system. Taking a total of 939 quatrains as a starting point, the Centuries cover exactly 18 Julian years. Actually, the Legis Cautio, the Latin quatrain in which ignorants are warned not to occupy themselves with the Centuries, is a boundary line. The 597 quatrains which precede the Legis Cautio, together with the total of 939 quatrains, cover the synodic periodof Saturn. The week in which certain planetary conjunctions occur, points to the place of a quatrain in the original order of quatrains.[7]

 

Loog on Fervers' comments
In Die Voraussagen, Loog compared Fervers' comments on quatrains with his own. Frequently, he quoted from Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus.[8]
Contrary to Fervers, Loog had the opinion that quatrain 08-37 was not directed against George VI, who in 1940 was the king of Great-Britain, but that this quatrain contained a prediction of the beheading in 1649 of the British king Charles I. According to him, this quatrain contained allusions to the imprisonment of Charles I in Windsor Castle near the Thames, the fact that Charles I, after he climbed the scaffold, took off his mantle and doublet, so that he could be seen in his undershirt, and the fact that his mortal remains were buried in the castle. In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog also had linked this quatrain to Charles I.[9]  
Loog contested the idea that the predictions in the Centuries which were meant for Germany, were but unfavourable. He also contested the idea that one could only comment a quatrain after its fulfilment. He ascertained that a number of quatrains would be fulfilled in the future. As a proof, he described that, basing himself upon quatrain 03-57, he expected crises in England and Poland in 1939, which turned out to be true. In 1940, German newspapers speculated about the flee of George VI. According to Loog, this would be the seventh time in 290 years that a British dynasty would come to an end, which would mean that quatrain 03-57 would be fulfilled completely.
Contrary to Fervers, Loog wrote that quatrain 05-52 did not deal with the actual circumstances in their lifetime. He shared Fervers' opinion that quatrain 05-51 did deal with these circumstances. 
Further, Loog wrote that he did not want to discuss quatrain 03-67, in which the rise of national-socialism might have been predicted. He proceeded to discuss quatrain 09-90, which he linked to the circumstances in Hungary at the time of the Second Viennese Arbitration in August 1940 and to Otto von Habsburg, who wanted to restore the monarchy in Austria/Hungary. About his comment on quatrain 09-90 in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog wrote that only his interpretation of the last line of this quatrain was not correct. He noticed that Nostradamus already wrote about Great-Germany, a conception which was used only after 1918. Without mentioning his name, Loog referred to Hitler as "the captain of Great-Germany".

 

Loog's further comments in Nostradamus Scharlatan?
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote that at the time of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, he located a series of quatrains in the correct period, around 1940, among which the quatrains 02-78, 02-100 and 01-61.  
Basing himself upon quatrain 06-24, Loog expected that after the war, a revolution would occur in France, followed by the restoration of the French monarchy. According to him, it was predicted in quatrain 04-100 that the new French king would settle in Normandy. In connection with this, Loog wrote that quatrain 06-20 indicated that by that time, the League of Nations officially would be closed.
Loog closed his discussion of the quatrains with the question how to explain that Nostradamus was aware of all these things and that in 1921 it was possible to read this from the Centuries.
At the end Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote that Fervers was right with his conclusions at the end of his article and that the device of the ancient Greecs was that an omen is the best way of defence for the home land. In addition, Loog wrote that Nostradamus knew what this defence was about: Die Feuer gegen die Schiffe bringt dem Westen Verderf!.[10]

  

Comments on Nostradamus Scharlatan?
In the comment in this article on Nostradamus Scharlatan?, attention is given to the key which Loog derived from the Centuries. Next, the comments in Nostradamus Scharlatan? are compared with Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus.  

a. Loogs key to the Centuries
In chapter XI (Der Schlüssel zu den Zenturien) in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog explained a number of elements of the key he derived from the Centuries. According to him, the Centuries covered a time span of about 22 centuries, running from 1555 to 3797. Nostradamus used the word Centurie as a reference to the original order of the quatrains. Loog stated that Nostradamus originally wrote the quatrains in 22 books, i.e. 13 books with 43 quatrains, 8 books with 42 quatrains and 1 book with 44 quatrains.
Loog thought that Nostradamus took a series of measurements in order to hide the meaning of his predictions. The first measure was the ordering of the quatrains by means of an eleven-letter word, a word which in Der Weissagungen des Nostradamus was not given.[11] Next came a second ordering. Loog did not give details about it. Then, Nostradamus shuffled the books which resulted from these measures in the same way as he shuffled all Latin expressions in the Preface to Cesar and the Epistle to Henry II. Finally, Nostradamus arranged the quatrains in Centuries, books which contained 100 quatrains.
For the purpose of this article, Loog's calculations in Nostradamus Scharlatan? were verified. He wrote that one quatrain covers one week and that the 939 quatrains cover exactly 18 Julian years. Verification:  939 quatrains x 7 days : 365,25 days = 17,9958 years. Further, he wrote that the addition of the number of weeks, covered by the 939 quatrains, to the number of 597 quatrains which precede the Legis Cautio, result in the synodic period of Saturn. His calculation: (597 weeks + 939 weeks) x 7 days : 365,25 days = 29,4374 years (29 years and 160 days). According to present-day encyclopedias, the synodic period of Saturn is 29 years and 167 days.
Loog wrote that the key which he derived from the Centuries, enabled him to reconstruct the original order of the quatrains and to say striking things about the past, the present and the future. This means that the order, reconstructed by Loog, must have been based upon the fulfilment years of the quatrains, which in one way or another result from the use of this key.

b. Loogs comments in Nostradamus Scharlatan? (1940) versus his comments in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (1921 [1920])

Quatrain 01-61
In both Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus and Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog translated the third line of quatrain 01-61(Leur grand amas de l'exil malefice) into "a great stream of refugees".
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog discussed quatrain 01-61 in connection with the quatrains 04-100 and 06-24, in which the restoration of the French monarchy was predicted. In France, riots would be started shortly after World War I, which would cause the flee of many French citizens. This stream of refugees would make it necessary for Germany to put an end to the Versailles Treaty.[12] 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog linked quatrain 01-61 to the flee of 12 million French citizens because of the German march to Paris in 1940 and the replacement in June 1940 of the Versailles Treaty by the German-French armystice. He did not discuss this quatrain in connection with the quatrains 04-100 and 06-24, the quatrains in which the restoration of the French monarchy was predicted. According to Loog, these quatrains would be fulfilled after the end of the war.

The quatrains  02-78 and 02-100
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog discussed the quatrains 02-78 and 02-100 in connection with quatrain 03-57, which, according to him, indicated that the decline of England would begin in 1939. Loog wrote that quatrain 02-78 made it clear that the supremacy of England could only be broken by submarines. Quatrain 02-100 contained an allusion to some kind of communist revolt in England, its nature like the revolt in Germany, lead by "robber-chief" Hölz, as Loog named him.[13] 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog linked the quatrains 02-78 and 02-100 to the circumstances in England in the summer of 1940, as described in a German newspaper. This fulfilment year more or less coincides with the year, supposed in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus

Quatrain 03-57
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog, following the German Dietrich von Dobbeler, the author of Merckwürdige Fata Der Groß-Britanischen Crone Sint der Zeit da die Religion reformiret worden (Hamburg, 1714) counted with six changes in England in the period 1649-1714. These changes had in common that they were the beginning of the reign of a new dynasty. The events which accompanied these changes were the beheading of Charles I, two political changes, the introduction of Catholicism, a dethroning, an economic crisis and the coronation of a member of the German Hanover dynasty.
The six changes in Nostradamus Scharlatan? had the end of the reign of a dynasty in common, which resulted in a series, which was different from the series in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus.[14] 
According to Loog, the events in Poland in September 1939 matched with what he wrote about crises in England and Poland in 1939 in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus. Quatrain 03-57 was at the verge to be fulfilled completely. In German newspapers, there was speculation about a flee of George VI. Loog wrote that such a flee would mean the end of the House of Windsor. That would be the seventh time in 290 year that a British dynasty would come to an end. Quatrain 03-57 would be fulfilled completely, in the way he had described in Nostradamus Scharlatan?: a time span of about 290 years, counting from 1649; seven endings of British dynasties, the first of them with bloodshed (the beheading of Charles I), the last of them in 1940/41 (the flee of George VI); no French influences on British dynasties but German (the coronation in 1714 of George I of Hanover, the marriage in 1837 of Elisabeth with Albert von Saksen-Coburg) and the fact that England and Poland, because of the outbreak of the war, simultaneousy seriously suffered from a crisis.

Quatrain 03-67
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog wrote in his comment on quatrain 03-67 that quickly, i.e. shortly after World War I, there would be a movement in Germany which would oppose wealth and pleasure, a movement which would be followed by the rest of the world. Loog did not mention a year.[15]
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote that he did not want to discuss this quatrain, in which the rise of national-socialism was announced. Besides, this quatrain was not discussed by Fervers at all.

The quatrains 04-100, 06-20 and 06-24
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog linked quatrain 06-24 to September 1919, when Mars in Cancer was in conjunction with Jupiter. In September 1919, according to present-day software, both Mars and Jupiter were in Leo, their conjunction took place on September 2, 1919, on 7 Leo. In connection with quatrain 04-100, Loog expected that some years after 1919, the Duke of Orléans, who in March 1920 had his residence in England, or his son, would travel to Normandy and would become king of France. Loog was pointing towards Louis-Philippe-Robert d'Orléans (1869-1926), great-great-grandson of king Louis-Philippe, who after his father's decease was considered to be the legitimate pretender of the French throne. It must be noted, however, that this Duke of Orléans had not children. In connection with the year 1939, derived from quatrain 03-57, Loog wrote that France for many years next to 1939 would live in peace, as a result of the new French king and his successor. 
Loog situated quatrain 06-20 shortly after World War I, without mentioning a fulfilment year.[16]
 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote that according to quatrain 06-24, after the war which had begun in September 1939, France would suffer from a revolution. Next, the French monarchy would be restored in Normandy, as indicated by quatrain 04-100. Loog did not tell in which year the war would be ended. Together with the restoration of the French monarchy, the League of Nations would come to an end, indicated by quatrain 06-20.

Quatrain 05-51
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog linked quatrain 05-51 to the years next to 1918; Bohemia, Poland and Rumania were discussed as England's allies. Loog speculated about a conflict between Italy and Spain regarding the free passage through the Strait of Gibraltar.[17] In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog began the comment on quatrain 05-51 with the words "today, 1940, we know..." and discussed Bohemia, Poland and Rumania as countries which were left alone by England. He linked quatrain 05-51 to the Sudete crisis (Bohemia, 1938), the German attack on Poland (1939) and the handing over of Rumanian districts to Russia and Italy (1940). In all these cases, England did nothing to protect the sovereignty of these countries and regions. Loog wrote nothing about a conflict regarding the free passage through the Strait of Gibraltar.

Quatrain 09-90
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog discussed quatrain 09-90 as an example of failing German politics after World War I. He linked the words Kapitän von Groß-Deutschland to the German president (Friedrich Ebert, TvB), who according to him by 1920 did not do anything to help a former king of Austria/Hungary (Karl I, TvB) with the realization of his royal claims.[18] 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog opened the comment on quatrain 09-90 with the words "today, 1940, we know...". According to him, it had become clear that only his comment on the last line of quatrain 09-90 was not correct: it was not Germany who pretended to help Otto von Habsburg, the former king of Austria/Hungary (and the son of Karl I, TvB), but France and England. 
With the remark that Germany truly helped Hungary, Loog meant the Second Viennese Arbitration in August 1940, presided by Joachim von Ribbentrop, the German secretary of State, in which Hungarian claims on Rumania partially were granted. In connection with this, Loog referred to Hitler, without mentioning his name.

According to Loog, Nostradamus foresaw everything which he discussed in Nostradamus Scharlatan?. Loog was the one who in 1920 read this all in the Centuries. In my opinion, this can be contested.
Most of the time, Loog's comments on the quatrains contain three elements: the nature of the events, the country in which they occur and the period in which they take place. Frequently, he refers to persons. From my point of view, a comment turns out to be striking if a reflection shows that the described event took place in the country which was mentioned and in the period which was mentioned. In the case the comment contains references to persons, these persons must have been involved in the way described in the comment. If on the contrary a different event is at stake, a different country, a different period or different persons, the comment turns out not to have been striking.
A comparison between the comments in Nostradamus Scharlatan? and Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus shows the following.

Quatrain 01-61 
According to Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, this quatrain dealt with a stream of refugees from France to Germany, caused by a revolution in France after World War I, followed by a restoration of the French monarchy. Because of the refugees, Germany was forced to put an end to the Versailles Treaty. In these years, however, there was no revolution in France, as there was no stream of French refugees to Germany. Neither there was a restoration of the French monarchy. Loog's comment was not at all striking, something which he could have known in 1940. 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?,  a stream of refugees was also mentioned, but within France, caused by the German aggression in 1940. In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, nothing was written about this.

The quatrains 02-78 and 02-100
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus and Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog discussed these quatrains in connection with quatrain 03-57, which had a time span which would end in 1939. In both publications, the period next to 1939 is mentioned as the fulfilment period. The difference between the comments on these quatrains in Die Weisssagungen des Nostradamus and Nostradamus Scharlatan? is that in Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog discussed a state of war which he did not promise in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus. The "communist revolt", mentioned in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, did not take place.  op kwatrijn 02-100 in Engeland zou voordoen, heeft zich niet voorgedaan. Loogs comment in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus was not at all striking, which he could have known in 1940.

Quatrain 03-67
From Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog's view on national-socialism can not be derived. Neither can it be derived if he thought that in his comment on quatrain 03-67 in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, the rise of national-socialism was announced.

The quatrains 04-100 and 06-24
In both Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus and Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote that the quatrains 04-100 and 06-24 dealt with revolts in France, followed by the restoration of the French monarchy in Normandy. According to his comment in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, this would occur shortly after 1920, whereas according to Nostradamus Scharlatan?, this would occur after the end of the war which started in 1939, without the mentioning of the year in which, according to the Centuries, this war would be over.
In the '20's, there was no revolution in France and the - childless (!) - Duke of Orléans did not try to cross over to Normandy to restore the French monarchy, which means that by 1940 Loog could have known that his comment in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus on the quatrains 04-100 and 06-24 was not striking.

Quatrain 05-51
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog linked this quatrain to the years next to 1918. In his comment, he discussed Bohemia, Poland and Rumania as allies of England. The conflict between Italy and Spain regarding the free passage through the Strait of Gibraltar did not occur. 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog linked quatrain 05-51 to the period 1938-1940. Bohemia, Poland and Rumania were the countries which were the victim of the insufficient British support. In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, however, nothing about this was mentioned. In 1940, Loog could have know that his comment in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus was complete ly different and that, regarding Gibraltar, this comment was not striking.

Quatrain 09-90
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog linked quatrain 09-90 to the period around 1920 and the German foreign politics which in his eyes failed. He linked this quatrain to the German president Ebert and the Austrian/Hungarian king Karl I, who abdicated in 1918, without giving up his royal claims. In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, he linked quatrain 05-51 to Otto von Habsburg and the Second Viennese Arbitration while referring to Hitler as the "captain of Great-Germany". This comment is entirely different from the comment in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, something which Loog by 1940 could have known.

Quatrain 03-57 and World War II
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog supposed the years next to the end of World War I as the years in which the quatrains 01-61, 04-100, 05-51, 06-20, 06-24 and 09-90 would be fulfilled. In other words: Loog stated that these quatrains would be fulfilled soon after the writing of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus. Perhaps, these fulfilment years resulted from the key he derived from the Centuries.
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog situated the quatrains 01-61, 04-100, 05-51, 06-20, 06-24 and 09-90 around the beginning of World War II. He opened his comment on the quatrains 05-51 and 09-90 with the words "today, 1940, we know...". In his comment on quatrain 03-57, he also mentioned 1940, because of the speculations in German newspapers about the flee of George VI.
The events which according to Loog would happen shortly after World War I, did not occur. His remark "today, 1940, we know..." might mean that the fulfilment years of these quatrains did not result from the key which Loog derived from the Centuries, but from the link of these quatrains to other events and persons. 
In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog had written nothing about a large-scale, armed European conflict which Nostradamus foresaw for 1939. In his comment on quatrain 03-57, Loog made the remark that both England and Poland would suffer from a crisis in 1939, at the same time. The words eine merkwürdige Krise at the beginning of chapter VIII show that he did not have the faintest idea about the nature of the crisis which would occur in England. He wrote nothing about the nature of the crisis in Poland.
Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus does not show a connection between the crisis in England and the one in Poland, or the involvement of other countries. The idea that the critical state in Poland, caused by the German invasion in September 1939, matches Loog's remark about a crisis in Poland, seems to be logical. However: a German invasion was at stake, which resulted in a world war. As for Germany, Loog did not expect a new world war before 2100, which he based upon quatrain 10-72, in which the birth was announced of the French king Henry the Fortunate, and a peace which would start around 2040 and would last for 57 years, according to quatrain 10-89.[19] 
Twice in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog had written that Germany's part in the world politics would be a very minor one. In connection with quatrain 05-51, he wrote: "Poor Germany, you will need much time to restore yourself a little bit."[20] Some lines further, he wrote that Germany, counting from the Versailles Treaty, would need about 200 years to become once again a superpower. Loog wrote that the Westphalia Treaty of 1648 was repeated. He considered that Treaty as humiliating for Germany as the Versailles Treaty, and after the Westphalia Treaty, Germany needed 200 years to become once again a wealthy nation.[21] By 1938 however, Germany had managed to some extent to realize Great-Germany, something mentioned by dr. Bruno Winkler in Nostradamus und seine Prophezeiungen für das zwanzigste Jahrhundert (Görlitz, 1939 [1938]).[22]
In connection with the year 1939, i.e. quatrain 03-57, Loog wrote in his comment to quatrain 10-46 that Germany once again would have electors and probably also an emperor, which would mean the end of the Weimar-republic. He did not write anything about German feats of arms in this period.[23] The rise of Hitler and his election in 1933 as Reichskanzler meant the end of the Weimar-republic. Germany, however, remained a republic and did not change into a kingdom or an empire. In September 1939, the Germans attacked Poland, a feat of arms about which nothing was announced in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus.
In an additional comment to quatrain 06-24, Loog wrote in connection with quatrain 03-57 that France after 1939 would live in peace for a long time. This was the merit of the Duke of Orléans (or his son [sic]); Loog supposed, basing himself upon the quatrains 04-100 and 06-24, that he would restore the French monarchy in the early '20's.[24] In September 1939, however, France declared war to Germany. In May 1940, Germany invaded France.
Considering this all, we see that Nostradamus, according to Loog, announced that a new world war would not break out before 2100. The crises in England and Poland which would occur in 1939, would not have any impact or consequences for other countries: Germany would change into a kingdom or an empire, France would live in peace until long after 1939. In September 1939, Germany invaded Poland. England and France declared war to Germany. Other countries mobilized their armies. However, in September 1939, the new world war was a fact. At the time of the writing of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog did not derive one single thing from the Centuries which later could be connected to this course of history. 
In Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote about the future of England, France and the League of Nations. His statements did not become reality. 
In connection with speculations in German newspapers about a flee of George VI, Loog wrote in his comment on quatrain 03-57 that this might mean the end of the House of Windsor; the seventh time in 290 years that a British dynasty would come to an end. The course of history did not match with his statements. George VI did not flee. Anno 2006, the House of Windsor still reings England. The series of seven changes, presented by Loog, cannot be linked to quatrain 03-57.
Regarding the quatrains 04-100 and 06-24, Loog wrote that after the war, a revolution would occur in France. Next, in Normandy, the French monarchy would be restored. Nothing of that kind happened. In connection with these quatrains he wrote that in quatrain 06-20 it was predicted that the League of Nations officially would come to an end. On April 19, 1946, the League of Nations came to an end. Her tasks were taken over by the United Nations Organization, founded in 1945. The question is if Loog meant that the League of Nations would come to an end without being replaced.

 

The nature of Nostradamus Scharlatan?
Nostradamus Scharlatan? is Loog's reply to the critical contribution by Fervers, published in #45 of volume 1940 of Der Reichswart. The introduction part of Nostradamus Scharlatan? shows that Loog asked the editorial staff of Der Reichswart to permit him to speak, according to the ancient Roman principle of hearing both sides (audiatur et altera pars). 
In the epilogue to the fourth edition of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (October 1921), Loog had written that by writing Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus he wanted to draw attention to the phenomenon or clairvoyance, to prove its existence and to present some peculiar and interesting findings of his research on the Centuries.[25]  
With
Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wanted to prove that in the sixteenth century, Nostradamus foresaw the circumstances in Europe in 1938-1940 and that in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus he, Loog, had described the outlines of these circumstances. In this article, it is demonstrated that Loog in Nostradamus Scharlatan? unjustly qualified his comments Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus as descriptions of outlines. In a number of cases, he did not at all discuss these comments. The main point of criticism is that Loog did not openly admit that in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, he wrote nothing about an outbreak in 1939 of a large-scale European conflict. Further, Nostradamus Scharlatan? raises the question if Loog's key was the only determination factor for fulfilment years or events.
According to my opinion, Nostradamus Scharlatan? was not written as a contribution to psychological warfare. In propagandistic writings, it is tried to intimidate the adversaries or to scold them, or it is tried to mobilize the internal public opinion.[26] Nostradamus Scharlatan? contains quite a lot of remarks which are directed against England. However, there is no indication that Loog wanted to undermine the morale of Germany's enemies or wanted the German people to support Hitler. His remarks about Great-Germany are, as far as I can see, due to nationalistic sentiments, not to national-socialist sentiments. He has not been a member of the NSDAP.
Loog qualified the criticism that Nostradamus was a charlatan and an impostor because he was a Jew of the third generation, as insufficient. In those days, it was quite risky to say such things. 
It is also striking that in Nostradamus Scharlatan?, Loog wrote that Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus was sold out for a long time. The German National Library and the Berlin State Library have preserved copies of reprints in 1940 of the fifth as well as the sixth edition of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus.

 

Loog versus Winkler
In his comment on quatrain 01-61, Loof qualified a colleague, who in 1939 translated the third and fourth line of quatrain 01-61
(Leur grand amas de l'exil malefice fera Sueve ravir leur grand contract) into "The great masses of unemployed makes it necessary for Germany to tear the Great Contract (the Versailles Treaty) to pieces", as a plagiator and a Procrustes. Loog did not specify the colleague nor his publication. The questionable translation can be found on p.37-38 in Nostradamus und seine Prophezeiungen für das zwanzigste Jahrhundert (dr. Bruno Winkler, Görlitz, 1939 [1938]).
It is not clear why Loog accused Winkler of plagiarism or of working like a Procrustes. In all his publications on Nostradamus, Winkler consequently referred to the publications he consulted, including page numbers. Next, Winkler always paid respect to Loog. For example, he qualified his decodation attempt as very intelligent.[27] Perhaps Loog was displeased with Winkler's Englands Aufstieg und Niedergang nach den Prophezeiungen des großen französischen Sehers Michel Nostradamus aus den Jahren 1555 und 1558 (Leipzig, 1940), in which he discussed the war by means of a.o. quatrain 03-57, which in his Nostradamus-novel Und dies geheimnisvolle Buch...! was linked to the period 1461-1751 and in Nostradamus und seine Prophezeiungen... not discussed at all.[28] In Englands Aufstieg und Niedergang..., Winkler referred to the Frenchman Charles Nicoullaud, who in Nostradamus - ses prophéties (Paris, 1914) wrote that the series of seven changes, mentioned in quatrain 03-57, was an allusion to seven changes regarding ruling dynasties. Winkler did not discuss the series of six events between 1649 and 1714 which Loog had presented. According to Winkler, Loog was the one who in 1921 wrote that 1939 would be fatal for Poland.[29] 
It is also possible that Loog was displeased with Winklers remark in Nostradamus und seine Prophezeiungen... regarding Loogs supposition that Germany, counting from 1918, would need 200 years to become a superpower once again. Winkler wrote that Loog was wrong, since Germany only had needed twenty years to become a superpower.[30]

 

The fortune of Nostradamus Scharlatan?
Enclosure #7 of a report about the state of affairs in Germany in the astrological field, which probably was made by the end of 1940 or the beginning of 1941, contained a displeased comment upon a.o. Nostradamus Scharlatan?. This enclosure was entitled Kriegspropaganda durch Nostradamus
In Kriegspropaganda durch Nostradamus, the reporter referred to an order of Alfred Rosenberg, the ideologist of the NSDAP, issued upon a non-described document which was conceived on January 30, 1940. In Rosenberg's order, it read that the circles of the NSDAP no longer were allowed to discuss the Centuries. Despite this order, two well-known German magazines published page-size articles on Nostradamus: Der Reichswart and Der Märkische Adler, amtliches Organ der Ostmark der Nationalsozialistischen Deutschen Arbeiterpartei (1926-1945). Further, the reporter criticized the spread of Krafft's photocopy of a 1568-B.Rigaud-edition of the Centuries, accompanied by his Einführung zu den PROPHÉTIES de Maistre Michel Nostradamus (Frankfurt am Main, 1940).
In the enclosure Kriegspropaganda durch Nostradamus, it was postulated that those who wanted to follow the Centuries, handed themselves over to the fatalism upon which the idea was founded that events in the twentieth century were described in oracle words, dating from the sixteenth century, as given facts. It was a thorn in the eyes of the reporter that Der Reichswart had permitted Loog in Nostradamus Scharlatan? to link the words "captain of Great-Germany" to Hitler and thus had involved Hitler in the Centuries. In the eyes of the reporter, the fact that Loog had written that he had a key to the Centuries, which enabled him to decipher each of Nostradamus' predictions, meant that leading persons had nothing else to do but to address themselves to Loog in order to get information about what else would be ahead.
At the end of the enclosure, it was strongly recommended to suppress war prophecies in general and notably those of Nostradamus.
On May 27, 1940, the article Die Kolonne des Nostradamus, written by dr. Th.Fr. Böttiger, was published in the Völkische Beobachter, the official newspaper of the NSDAP.[31] Kraffts Einführung... was printed on October 12, 1940. The criticized edition of Der Reichswart dated from December 1940, the edition of Der Märkische Adler dated from January 1941. Perhaps Rosenberg's order dated from the second half of 1940. The critic of the reporter that the editorial staff of Der Reichswart had permitted Loog to link the words "captain of Great-Germany" to Hitler, seems to confirm Noelle's statement that it primary was up to the editorial staffs to decide about the contents of an article.

 

Rumours in the Netherlands, based upon a comment upon quatrain 03-57 
In connection with the year 1939 and the British Royal House, either comments upon or a rumour, based upon comments upon quatrain 03-57, wer discussed in the article Fransch-Duits debat on page 1 of the edition of October 11, 1939 of the Dutch daily Haarlemsch Dagblad. The author of this article noted that the rumour that the British king would abdicate and succeeded by the Duke of Windsor, had not become true. He supposed that this rumour came from someone who had read the Prophecies of Nostradamus. It was alleged to Nostradamus that he had predicted that in 1939, the British king would abdicate and be succeeded by a member of his House, so that the line of the British dynasty would not be broken. Personally, I think that this rumour is based upon the comment upon quatrain 03-57 by Dietrich von Dobbeler in Merckwürdige Fata... (Hamburg, 1714). Von Dobbeler supposed that in 1939, the last revolution in England would take place and that then the British dynasty would be continued until the end of time.

 

De Meern, the Netherlands, October 22, 2006
T.W.M. van Berkel
updated on
February 28, 2012

 

In this article, a copy has been studied of Loog's Prophete rechts - Prophete links - War Nostradamus wirklich Scharlatan und Betrüger? (Berlin State Library, signature 2" Ad 768MR / Unter den Linden).

 

Notes
The titles, places and year of issue of the mentioned authors are listed in the bibliography.

  1. See: Van Berkel:
    -
    Quatrain 03-57 and Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (C. Loog, Pfullingen in Württemberg, 1921 [1920]);
    - The 1939-fortune of Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (dr. H.H. Kritzinger, DE, 1961);
    - Information on C. Loog;
    - Informatie on prof. dr. H-H. Kritzinger.
    [text]

  2. See: Van Berkel: Prophete rechts, Prophete links... (in: Der Reichswart #45, November 7, 1940).
    The author of the article in #45 of Der Reichswart might have been Hans Kurt Fervers (Fiebig to Van Berkel, October 24, 2006). Hans Kurt Fervers, born on September 18, 1911, was head of the NSDAP Press office. He occupied himself with the German youth and wrote a great number of publications, directed against Jews and freemasonry.
    A couple of facts about the weekly Der Reichswart are given in the article Information on Der Reichswart (a national-socialist weekly, Berlin, 1920-1944). [text]

  3. See: Van Berkel: Die Erschaffung der Demoskopie (W. Hagen im Gespräch mit E. Noelle-Neumann, 1998 [1996]) [text]

  4. Loog-1921, p.109: "During and after war, the leaning towards mysticism easily obtains foothold, which makes people less critical." [text]

  5. Procrustes: a robber in Greek mythology who assaulted travelers and imprisoned them. A traveler whose height was too small, was stretched in a long bed; a traveler whose height was too long, was mutilated until he fitted into a small bed. [text]

  6. In those days, Kritzinger was the editor-in-chief of P. In a footnote on the discussion between Von Klinckowstroem and Loog in Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (Berlin, 1922 [1921]), Kritzinger wrote that Von Klinkcowstroem's critic was obvious and that Loog's reply was plausible (Kritzinger-1922a, p.127). [text]

  7. In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, Loog also counted with 939 quatrains, he excluded the quatrains 01-01 and 01-02 and the Legis Cautio. His source text was Le Pelletier's Les oracles de Michel de Nostredame, Paris, 1867 (Loog-1921, p.8). In this text, Century 6 consisted of 99 numbered quatrains and one quatrain, the Legis Cautio, which did not carry a number. Century 7 consisted of 42 quatrains. Each of the remaining Centuries consisted of 100 quatrains. [text]

  8. Loog referred to a different edition of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus than the sixth edition which has been used in this article. This edition counts 132 pages; the first edition counted 135 pages. Therefore, Loog's page references in Nostradamus Scharlatan? differ from the page references in this article. The pages to which Loog referred, are given between brackets. [text]

  9. Loog-1921, p.20-21 (p.22). The text of quatrain 08-37 in Nostradamus Scharlatan? is identical to the text in Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus. [text]

  10. The line Die Feuer gegen die Schiffe bringt dem Westen Verderf! is Loog's translation of the second line of quatrain 09-100. The French text of this line reads: Le feu aux naves à l'Occident ruine.[text

  11. On the last page of the first edition of Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, the editor had stated that on December 22, 1920, Loog gave him the code word under the restriction of keeping it secret. A couple of weeks later, in front of a notary, Loog declared on oath about his key (Howe, p.218-219). [text]  

  12. Loog-1921, p.61-62 (p.65). [text]   

  13. Loog-1921, p.70-71 (p.75).[text]

  14. See the paragraph "Loogs comment in 1940 on quatrain 03-57" in: Van Berkel: Quatrain 03-57 and Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (C. Loog, Pfullingen in Württemberg, 1921 [1920]). [text

  15. Loog-1921, p.67-68 (p.72). [text

  16. Loog-1921, p.60-61, 65 and 72. [text]

  17. Loog-1921, p.66 (p.71). [text

  18. Loog-1921, p.66-67 (p.71). [text]

  19. Loog-1921, p.86. In Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus, quatrain 10-89 is erroneously numbered as quatrain IX-89. [text]

  20. Loog-1921, p.66. [text]

  21. Loog-1921, p.86. [text]

  22. Winkler-1939, p.45. [text]

  23. Loog-1921, p.71. [text]

  24. Loog-1921, p.68-72. [text]

  25. Loog-1921, p.130. [text]

  26. See: Van Berkel: Quadrains de Nostradamus Imprimez à Aix-en-Provence, 1525 / Eenige Prophetien van Michiel Nostradamus, van 't jaer 1525, tot Ake in Proventie gedruckt, dewelcke nu in dese tijd worden vervuldt. [text]

  27. Winkler-1939, p.44. [text]

  28. Winkler-1940, p.23-25; Winkler-1937, p.65. [text]

  29. See: Van Berkel: Quatrain 03-57 and Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (C. Loog, Pfullingen in Württemberg, 1921 [1920]).  [text]

  30. Winkler-1939, p.45. [text]

  31. See: Van Berkel: Die Kolonne des Nostradamus (Dr. Th.Fr. Böttiger, Völkischer Beobachter, Berlin, May 27, 1940) [text]

 
 

 
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