NOSTRADAMUS, ASTROLOGY AND THE BIBLE
SUBSTUDY "WORLD WAR II"
Nostradamus or the future foretold (2nd, revised edition)
(J. Laver, Harmondsworth, 1952)
- T.W.M. van Berkel -

Nederlandse versie
 

Laver-1952In 1942, the first edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold, a study by James Laver on Nostradamus and the Centuries, was published by Collins in London.[1] Ten years later, in 1952, seven years after the end of World War II, Penguin Books in Harmondsworth published the second, revised edition.
In this article, the contents of the second revised edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold are compared with the contents of the first edition, notably chapter 9, in which Laver linked a number of quatrains to World War II and events which preceded this war. 

 

Contents
The second edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold counts 265 pages of text and a couple of pages with list of titles of other books, published by Penguin Books. In both editions, the arrangement of the text in chapters is identical. In the second edition, the chapters are numbered with Arab figures instead of Roman figures. The titles in the second edition of two paragraphs in the bibliography differ slightly from those in the first edition.

  • Prologue
  • ch. 1: Nostradamus the Physician
  • ch. 2: Nostradamus the Prophet
  • ch. 3: The House of the Seven
  • ch. 4: The House of Bourbon
  • ch. 5: Nostradamus and the History of England
  • ch. 6: Nostradamus and the French Revolution
  • ch. 7: Nostradamus and Napoleon I
  • ch. 8: The Restoration that was and the Restoration that wasn't

  • ch. 9: To the End of the World
  • Epilogue
  • Appendix: The Prophecy of Olivarius and the "Prophétie d'Orval"
  • Bibliography: Principal Early Editions of the "Centuries" of Nostradamus; Principal Commentators on Nostradamus; Other Works Consulted

The second edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold does not contain illustrations. The portrait of Nostradamus, which in the first edition preceded the title page, is not included in the second edition.
Like the title page of the first edition, the title page of the second edition contains a statement by Napoleon III regarding the Centuries:  Ça épouvante et énerve l'imagination. The Legis Cautio, the warning, directed to inapt critics, in some editions of the Centuries a not-numbered quatrain which comes next to quatrain 06-99, in other editions a not-numbered quatrain which is situated between the sixth and the seventh Century, is not printed on the title page of the second edition. It was printed on the title page of the first edition.

 

Laver's method
In the article in which the first edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold is discussed, it has been written that Laver linked one event to each of the quatrains he discussed. He linked a quatrain to an event if the contents of a quatrain corresponded with the event, preferably by concrete clues like names of persons or places or year figures. It is not always clear which quatrains Laver himself linked to certain events and which links he copied from comments by Century-scholars like Bareste, D.D., Dr. de Fontbrune, Le Pelletier, Du Vignois en Ward.
Regarding Laver's method, it must be noted that there is not one guarantee that such a method results in an explanation which corresponds with the intentions of the compiler of the quatrains. Further, we can only Hope that Laver, while examining past events, did not overlook one or more events and that in the future there will not be events which correspond in a better way with the contents of a quatrain which is considered to be fulfilled, than the event which in the past has been linked to that particular quatrain.
In the course of the years, Laver's method did not change. In the second edition, he linked one event to each of the discussed quatrains, basing himself upon preferably names of persons and places or year figures.
A comparison of the bibliographies of the first and the second edition shows that for the second edition, Laver consulted three extra publications on Nostradamus and the Centuries: Nostradamus (H.I. Woolf, London, 1944); Nostradamus, ses prophéties 1948-2023 (E. Ruir, Paris, 1947) and Nostradamus, sa famille, son secret (R. Busquet, Paris, 1950). In the chapter To the end of the world, he referred to a link by dr. De Fontbrune of quatrain 04-61 to marshal Pétain, published on July 22, 1950, in an article in Ici Paris.
The fascinating thing about the second edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold is that Laver included a number of suggestions, coming from people who contacted him about Nostradamus and the Centuries. In most cases, these suggestions are published in footnotes; in one or two cases, Laver included a suggestion in his text. They enforce the comments which Laver had given in the first edition. This rises the question if Laver in the years between the first and the second edition also received suggestions to change comments. In the prologue to the second edition, nothing is written about the inclusion of suggestions. Without any change or addition, this prologue was copied from the first edition.

 

World War II
The first edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold dates from 1942. The war was in full swing and became a world-wide war. In June 1941, the German army invaded the Soviet-Union. In December 1941, the Japanese Air Force bombed the American Navy basis in Pearl Harbour. In chapter IX, Laver had written that without an attempt to link quatrains to contemporary events and events which would take place in the immediate future, a book like Nostradamus or the future foretold would be incomplete.[2] Such an attempt would be hindered by the vague contents of a number of quatrains and by translation problems. Nevertheless, he discussed links between 33 quatrains and events which happened in the first years of the war, preceded this or would happen in the immediate future. Basing himself upon the quatrains 02-89 and 05-78, Laver expected that Hitler and Mussolini would not hold out for long. According to him, a revolt against Mussolini was predicted in the quatrains 06-31, 06-68 and 08-47. Laver did not make clear in which year the regimes of Hitler and Mussolini would come to an end.[3]
Seven years after the end of World War II, the second edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold was published. According to the colophon, the text of the first edition was revised and brought up to date. In the second edition, World War II was discussed in the same chapter as in the first edition: chapter 9, entitled To the end of the world.
In the second edition, large parts of the text of Laver's expectations about the course of the war at the time of the first edition, returned without any change. In other words: in the second edition, texts which in the first edition dealt with the future, dealt with the past without any change. At the time of the first edition for example, the question was how long Hitler and Mussolini would hold. According to Laver, who based himself upon quatrain 05-78, this would not be for long. Seven years before the second edition, their power came to an end. Both editions contain the same text about this:

Laver-1942, p.223 Laver-1952, p.231
The two dictators will not hold out for long:

Les deux amis ne tiendront longuement.... (V, 78)

but will be put down from their seats, and the appointed time of the Man of Blood will be accomplished:

Un jour seront demis les deux grands maistres....
Au sanguinaire le nombre racompté.
(II, 89)

The two dictators will not hold out for long:

Les deux amis ne tiendront longuement.... (V, 78)

but will be put down from their seats, and the appointed time of the Man of Blood will be accomplished:

Un jour seront demis les deux grands maistres....
Au sanguinaire le nombre racompté.
(II, 89)

On page 221, in his discussion about the fatuity of comments by French Century-scholars which dated from the years after World War I, Laver rectified the false statement on page 214 in the the first edition that Melanie Calvat, the shepherdess of La Salette, lived in the twentieth century.
In the second edition, Laver did not mention which of his expectations in 1942 about the course of the war were fulfilled and which not. Quatrain 08-47, in the first edition linked to an expected conspiracy in which Germans would be killed, did not return in the second edition. Apparently, Laver left this quatrain out because he thought that such an event never took place.
New in the second edition was the discussion of quatrain 04-61. Laver copied the link of this quatrain to the deportation by the Germans on April 6, 1944, of the French marshal Pétain, from an article by dr. De Fontbrune, published on July 22, 1950 in Ici Paris.[4] Another newly discussed quatrain was quatrain 09-16. In the second edition, Laver took over the link of this quatrain to Franco and Rivera from a certain W.G. Campbell, who had drawn his attention to this link.[5] 
In two cases in chapter 9 in the second edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold, Laver's comment differs from the comment in the first edition. In the first edition, basing himself upon quatrain 06-68, Laver expected that the collapse of the Axis-powers would begin with a revolt against Mussolini. In the second edition, he linked this quatrain to the attempt of Badoglio to bring the war to an end and Mussolini's violent reaction to it, as Laver described it.[6] It is not clear why Laver did not link this quatrain to the dismiss of Mussolini by the Great Fascist Council in the night of July 24 / 25 1943. This might be caused by the fact that he continued with the discussion of quatrain 06-31 and linked this quatrain to the execution of Count Galeazzo Ciano, one of the key figures in the government of Mussolini, who, together with others, prepared his fall. In the second edition, Laver inserted the fate of Ciano in the original text. In the first edition, however, it was the Italian king who would order executions.

Laver's comment in 1942 and 1952 on quatrain 06-31

Laver-1942, p.224 Laver-1952, p.232
Then the King of Italy will have his desire, by getting rid of Mussolini.

Roy trouvera ce qu'il désiroit tant,
Quand le Prelat sera reprins à tort,
Response au Duc le rendra mal content,
Qui dans Milan mettra plusieurs à mort.
(VI,31)

The King will find what he so much desired when the Prelate shall be wrongfully taken; the response received by the Duce will anger him, and in Milan he will put several to death. The second line may be linked with a quatrain which created considerable interest in the years just before the war because of its plain statement that the See of Rome would be transferred elsewhere by the power of three temporal rulers who were then supposed to be Hitler, Mussolini and Franco [...]

Then the King of Italy will have his desire, by getting rid of Mussolini.

Roy trouvera ce qu'il désiroit tant,
Quand le Prelat sera reprins à tort,
Response au Duc le rendra mal content,
Qui dans Milan mettra plusieurs à mort.
(VI,31)

The King will find what he so much desired when the Prelate shall be wrongfully taken; the response received by the Duce will anger him, and in Milan he will put several to death. The execution of Ciano and others may seem to be glanced at this. The second line may be linked with a quatrain which created considerable interest in the years just before the war because of its plain statement that the See of Rome would be transferred elsewhere by the power of three temporal rulers who were then supposed to be Hitler, Mussolini and Franco [...]

In the second edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold, Laver sharpened a number of comments with remarks, made by others. For example, he sharpened his comment on quatrain 01-47, which he linked to the League of Nations, with a translation suggestion from a certain James A.A. Porteous.[7] His comment upon the Hister-quatrains (the quatrains 02-29, 04-68 and 05-29) was sharpened by the remark of a certain Vincent Pautin that Nostradamus had written the word Hister with a long S, by which the resemblance with the name Hitler was emphasized even more.[8] In the first edition, in connection with quatrain 04-68, one of the Hister-quatrains, linked to Hitler and Mussolini, Laver had written that he could not explain the first line (En lieu bien proche non esloigné de Venus / In a place not far removed from Venus). In the second edition, this remark returned, but accompanied by a footnote in which he referred to the suggestion of a certain W. Dawson Sadler that Venus should be read as Venice and the words lieu bien proche as a reference to the conference of Hitler and Mussolini at the Brenner Pass.[9] 
In the second edition, Laver maintained most of his comments on World War II. In connection with the course of the war, he discussed the rise of Franco and Rivera and the deportation in August 1944 of Pétain and he referred to Badoglio and the execution of Ciano. It is not clear if he looked for quatrains, which contents might correspond more or less with for example the Holocaust, the battles in North-Africa, the course of the war in the Soviet-Union, the Allied invasion on June 6, 1944 (D-Day) or the bombing in August 1945 by the Americans of Hiroshima and Nagasaki with nuclear bombs.

 

Discussed quatrains about World War II and events which preceded this war (Laver-1952, p.221-233)

08-28 
01-47 
03-54 
09-16 
10-98
01-34
04-80
09-90
05-94
02-50
03-07
03-99
02-24 
04-68
05-29
08-33
08-31
09-80
04-51
02-40
03-82
04-48
05-08
04-15
03-71
05-51
06-07
03-97
05-78
02-89
04-61
06-68
06-31
08-99
Inflation in Europe in the twenties
The League of Nations
Rise of Franco; Spanish Civil War
Franco and Rivera
Corruption in France, resulting in the capitulation of France in 1940
Prior to the war, Hitler undermines France
The Germans pass the Maginot-line
Hitler's politics to "protect" countries
1940: German invasion in the Netherlands, Belgium and the north of France
1940: capitulation of Belgium
Air raids on French troops who draw themselves back to Paris
France is split, Paris no longer represents France
Hister: Hitler's politics of expansion
Hister: Tripartite-pact, air raids on Malta and Genoa
Hister: first conference of Hitler and Mussolini
First conference of Hitler and Mussolini
First conference of Hitler and Mussolini
Mussolini persecutes his former associates after he came into power
Mussolini persecutes his former associates after he came into power
The use of the torpedo
The use of the airplane
The use of the airplane
The use of bombs
The use of submarines
The German-British blockade turns out to be favourable for England
The "Small Entente"
Norway, the Balkans and England are troubled by Hitler and Mussolini
Hitler's Drang nach Osten
Hitler and Mussolini will not hold out for long
Hitler and Mussolini will not hold out for long
1944: arrest by the Germans of marshal Pétain
Mussolini's violent reaction to Badoglio's attempt to bring the war to an end
Fall of Mussolini; execution of Ciano and others 
Before 1939: the Holy See must be evacuated because of Franco, Hitler and Mussolini

 

 

Laver-1981 (1973)The third edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold [10]
In 1973, George Mann publishers in Maidstone, Kent, published the third edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold. Two years later, Laver would die in a fire.
In the literature study upon which the discussion of Laver's books about Nostradamus and the Centuries is based, a copy of a limp edition, dating from 1981, of the third edition has been used. This limp edition was also published by George Mann in Maidstone, Kent. According to bibliographic data in the third edition of Nostradamus or the future foretold, the text of this edition was revised once more.
In the third edition, like in the other editions, World War II and events which preceded it, were discussed in chapter 9, entitled To the end of the world. A comparison between the text of chapter 9, as far as in this text World War II is discussed and events prior to it, with the text in the second edition, shows that the text in the third edition remained unchanged.

 

De Meern, the Netherlands, May 11, 2007
T.W.M. van Berkel

 

Notes
The titles, places and year of issue of the mentioned authors are listed in the bibliography.

  1. Van Berkel: 
    - Nostradamus or the future foretold (J. Laver, London, 1942)
    - Information on J. Laver. [text]

  2. Laver-1942, p.214. [text]

  3. Laver-1942, p.223. [text]

  4. Laver-1942, p.231. [text

  5. Laver-1952, p.223. [text]

  6. Laver-1942, p.223; Laver-1952, p.232. [text

  7. Laver-1952, p.222. [text]

  8. Laver-1952, p.225. [text]

  9. Laver-1942, p.218-219; Laver-1952, p.226-227. [text]

  10. It looks as if the third edition is a reprint of the second edition, without any changes. [text]

 
 

 
Home (EN)
New articles
Updated articles
Nostradamus
Research results
Analysis quatrains
World War II 
Debate platform
Publications
Lectures
Interviews/reviews
French research
Web links
Contact
Free newsletter
Privacy / cookies
Editorial

 
top

© T.W.M. van Berkel, De Meern, NL
alle rechten voorbehouden / all rights reserved

top