NOSTRADAMUS, ASTROLOGY AND THE BIBLE
SUBSTUDY "WORLD WAR II"
Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung 
(B. von Borresholm / K. Niehoff, Berlin, 1949)
- T.W.M. van Berkel -

 Nederlandse versie
 

Von Borresholm Niehoff 1949

Von Borresholm / Niehoff
1949

Nostradamus (Von Borresholm and Niehoff, 1949)
In 1949, the Journal Verlag in Berlin published Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung, a publication which was approved by the French military government. In this book, Boris von Borresholm and Karena Niehoff presented a portrait of dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels, minister of Propaganda in Nazi-Germany from 1933 to 1945, by means of diaries, kept for about twenty years by people who lived in his environment.[1]  
Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung
consists of four parts: (1) Umrisse, (2) Episoden, (3) Dokumente en (4) Die Physiognomie, an epilogue, writen by Konrad Schneider. Part 2 contains a paragraph, entitled Nostradamus. In this paragraph, Von Borresholm and Niehoff described events which according to them took place after the failed attempt on Hitler in November 1939.
According to Von Borresholm and Niehoff, on November 9, 1939, in the Bürgerbräukeller in Munich, an attempt was committed during the meeting of the "Bearers of the Blood Order", six minutes after Hitler and his suite departed. During his voyage back to Berlin in the special train, Hitler was informed about the attempt and discussed with Goebbels the measurements which had to be taken. By the time the train arrived in Berlin, Hitler invited Goebbels to look at the comments in the foreign newspapers, the day after, during lunch.[
2]  
The next day, Hitler showed Goebbels a letter, dated on November 2, 1939. In this letter, Karl Ernst Krafft, living in a village in the Black Forest, wrote that he practiced astrology for many years, erected Hitler's chart and warned that from November 7 to November 10, 1939, his life would be threatened by violence. Krafft was aware of the fact that the party did not have any affiliation with astrology, but as a party member, he felt it was his duty to press Hitler not to expose himself in the public unnecessarily, but to ensure a higher degree of security. The letter was closed with the words Heil Hitler and the signature "Karl Ernst Krafft".
Goebbels knew that Hitler was in search of a "Seni" for quite a long time.
[3] Being an astrologer, Krafft could supply this want, which would mean that Goebbels no longer would have an influence on Hitler. Goebbels however could say nothing against the letter, and proceeded to discuss the articles in the foreign newspapers about the attempt. The letter was handed to Heinrich Himmler, the head of the German police, who had to investigate if Krafft had anything to do with the attempt.
A few days later, Goebbels send one of his assistants to make inquiries about Krafft. Actually, he considered it better that Krafft would be within his sphere of influence than that this astrologer would have influence on Hitler. Goebbels learned that Krafft lived in obscurity in the Black Forest and translated French books. Meanwhile, Krafft was arrested by the Gestapo. There was no incriminating evidence. Goebbels managed that Krafft was released and next brought to his study at the Wilhelmplatz in Berlin, unknown to his caretaker and servants.
[4] Goebbels asked him questions about his letter of November 2. Krafft said that he wrote his letter because he worried about Hitler's well-being and did not understand the reason why he was arrested. When Goebbels told him that he was the one who got him released from prison, Krafft thanked him with tears in his eyes. 
When Goebbels asked him what he was doing at present, Krafft showed him a manuscript, entitled Einführung zu den Prophéties de Maistre Michel Nostradamus. He read out a quatrain text:

Translatera en la grande Germanie
Brabant et Flandes, Gent, Bruges, Boloigne:
La Traisue fainte, le grand duc d'Armenie,
Assailira Vienne et la Coloigne.
[5] 

Krafft's explanation: because the armistice was faked, the great Leader of Arminia (Armin's land) will transfer Brabant, Flanders, Gent, Brugue and Boulogne to Germany and will occupy Vienna and the Rhine region by surprise.
Goebbels realized that Krafft had no notice about the value of his material. He told him that in the future, he could be very useful, provided that he would swear not to talk about this. Krafft promised to be silent about this matter. Goebbels wanted Krafft to analyse Hitler's horoscope day after day and to write him, Goebbels, immediately if there were indications of danger. In order to do this, Krafft had to be within reach of Goebbels. Goebbels would take care that Krafft would get a job in the French translation section of the Deutsche Nachrichtenbüro.
Von Borresholm and Niehoff end their essay with the remark that a few months later, millions of leaflets were spread over the Maginot-Line. In French, it was printed that Nostradamus not only predicted Hitler's march to the Rhine region and Austria, but also his conquest of Belgium and the Channel Coast. It was to be hoped that the readers would not notice that the prediction contained the words "grand duke of Armenia" (grand duc d'Armenie) instead of the words "great Leader of Armin's land".
According to the publisher of Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnung aus seiner Umgebung, all events and statements which Von Borresholm and Niehoff described, even the most surprising and unlikely ones, were written the very same day in diaries which on a later moment would become available for the public.

 

The fortune of the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay
In Kriegspropaganda 1939-1941 - Geheime Ministerkonferenzen im Reichspropagandaministerium (Stuttgart, 1966), Willi A. Boelcke gave a summary of the Nostradamus-essay, written by Von Borresholm and Niehoff. With this summary, he wanted to illustrate a control measurement, ordered in the secret daily propaganda conference of November 11, 1939. According to item 4 of the minutes of this conference, the contents of astrological publications had to be checked due to November 9, 1939. 
Between November 1939 and September 1940, arrangements were made regarding the production and spread of national-socialist propaganda material, based upon the Centuries in a number secret daily propaganda conferences. In connection with the Nostradamus-essay by Von Borresholm and Niehoff, Boelcke supposed that Goebbels for the first time heard about the Centuries in his conversation with Krafft, shortly after his release from prison. Boelcke silently corrected the false date of the attempt, given by Von Borresholm and Niehoff.
[6]
Ellic Howe (Uranias Kinder: die seltsame Welt der Astrologen und das Dritte Reich, DE, 1995, UK: 1984 [1967]) did a detailed research on Krafft's life and work. According to Howe, who only read Boelcke's summary of the Nostradamus-essay, written by Von Borresholm and Niehoff, and not of the essay itself, this essay is not a reliable source, even if the core of it would be true. Howe doubts if the letter, written by Krafft on November 2, 1939, reached Hitler.
[7]

 

Uranias Kinder...: Howe 's version of the course of events around the failed attempt on Hitler
In the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay, Goebbels and Krafft are the principal players. Von Borresholm and Niehoff based themselves upon diaries, which were kept by people who lived in the environment of Goebbels, one of the principal players. 
In Uranias Kinder..., Ellic Howe based himself, regarding the events around the failed attempt on Hitler in November 1939, on conversations he had with people who knew Krafft, the other principal player (without comparing the contents of these conversations with the information, given by Von Borresholm and Niehoff): prof. Hans Bender, (para-)psychologist,
F.G. Goerner, astrologer/educationalist; prof. dr. Hans-Hermann Kritzinger, PSI-investigator and investigator of the Centuries and Geog Lucht, who assisted Krafft in the first months of 1940 in the shape of typing out his texts. Their contacts with Krafft dated from before 1939.
According to Howe, Krafft wrote in one of the astrologic/economic/political columns which he wrote by order of Heinrich Fesel, chief of Amt VII of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt), that Hitler's life would be in danger in the period between November 7 and November 10, 1939, and that chances were that there would be an attempt with explosives. When on November 9, 1939, the failed attempt on Hitler became known, Krafft sent a telegram to Rudolf Heß, in which he referred to his column and warned that there was still danger. This message was looked up in the archives and handed over to Hitler, who showed it to Goebbels during breakfast. The same day, Krafft was arrested by the Gestapo in Freiburg, the next day he was transferred to Berlin for a cross-examination by the Sicherheitsdienst, who released him at a certain moment, because no incriminating evidence was found. 
In December 1939, Krafft was summoned to Berlin. Goebbels wanted a Nostradamus-expert who could study the Centuries for reasons of psychological warfare. In Berlin, Krafft did not meet with Goebbels, but with Fesel, who made agreements with him about this. In the first week of January 1940, Krafft and his wife settled in Berlin. 
Around April/May 1940, Krafft started to work in the French translation section of the Deutsche Nachrichtenbüro. His task was to translate German texts into French. A friend in Hamburg drew his attention to this job. He worked in this section until his arrest on June 12, 1941, in connection with the Aktion-Heß.

 

Comparison between Von Borresholm / Niehoff and Howe
Howe's version of the course of events around the failed attempt on Hitler in 1939 differs almost completely from the version, given by Von Borresholm and Niehoff. Some striking differences in Howe's version are that Hitler, according to Howe, was not interested in astrology and that Goebbels is mentioned only a few times. 

1. Hitler's interest in astrology
According to Von Borresholm and Niehoff, Goebbels knew that for a long time, Hitler was in search of a "Seni". Being an astrologer, Krafft would be able to supply this want, which would mean that Goebbels no longer would have an influence on Hitler.
According to Von Borresholm and Niehoff, Krafft wrote that astrology did not appeal to "the party" (the NSDAP). This is in accordance with Howe's information about growing restrictions for astrologers in Germany and the termination of astrological societies and magazines since the national-socialists were in charge. Further, Howe reports that Hitler, according to one of his secretaries, was not interested in astrology, which means that regarding astrology, Hitler and "the party" took the same line. In his explanation of the minutes of the secret daily propaganda conference of December 11, 1939, Boelcke writes that Hitler sanctioned the issue of a prohibition of astrological calendars, by which he made an end to fierce discussions between some Nazi-quarters about the required attitude towards astrology.[8]

2. Krafft's professions
The facts about Krafft's professions, revealed by Howe, are quite different from the facts, revealed by Von Borresholm and Niehoff. According to them, Krafft was a translator of French books during the years he was settled in Urberg. In Uranias Kinder..., Howe told that in that period, Krafft wrote a book in French: Traité d'Astro-Biologie, published in the summer of 1939 and said nothing about being a translator.
According to Von Borresholm and Niehoff, Goebbels ordered Krafft to analyze Hitler's horoscope day after day, in order to keep an eye on threats and danger. Howe writes nothing about an intervention by Goebbels to have Krafft released from prison, as he writes nothing about a conversation between them, next to the release. According to Howe, in January 1940, Krafft settled in Berlin in order to produce national-socialist propaganda writings, based upon the Centuries, under supervision of Fesel. Howe also writes nothing about an order to analyze Hitler's horoscope day after day. 
According to Von Borresholm and Niehoff, Goebbels would take care that Krafft became employed at the French translation section of the Deutsche Nachrichtenbüro. Howe writes that Krafft began to work in this section in May/June 1940. His attention to this work was raised by a friend from Hamburg. Howe writes nothing about a mediation by Goebbels.

3. National-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries
The conversation between Howe and Kritzinger in 1961 is opposite to the information, given by Von Borresholm and Niehoff about a conversation between Goebbels and Krafft, next to his release from prison, in which Goebbels became impressed by the propagandistic value of Krafft's comment on quatrain 05-94. 
Kritzinger knew Krafft very well and cooperated with him in 1940 in the writing of national-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries. Kritzinger told nothing about a conversation between Goebbels and Krafft next to his release, in which Krafft commented quatrain 05-94. Kritzinger told that he was more or less responsible for the fact that Krafft became involved in the production of national-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries. According to his information, Goebbels became interested in the Centuries when his wife, shortly after the German invasion in Poland in September 1939, read him some lines from Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (Berlin, 1922), in which Kritzinger referred to his compatriot Loog, who in 1921, in his comment on quatrain 03-57, wrote that in 1939 the last crisis in England in a series of seven would occur, which series started in 1649, and that at the same time a crisis would occur in the resurrected Poland. In connection with these lines, Goebbels decided to use the Centuries for psychological warfare. In December 1939, Krafft was summoned to Berlin. Of all the candidates he seemed to be most suited to produce national-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries. In Berlin, Krafft did not meet Goebbels; he met Fesel, who instructed him about his new task.[9]
In the first week of January 1940, Krafft and his wife settled in Berlin. In the beginning, they stayed in a hotel for a few days, next, they temporarily moved in the house of Carl Maria Holzapfel, a friend and author. In the beginning of January 1940, Lucht said he was willing to assist Krafft in his Nostradamus activities. Together, they went to Fesel and signed a document in which they promised to keep their activities secret. In that period, Fesel and Krafft met each other almost every day.[10] Regarding January 8, 1940, Goebbels wrote in his diary that for Nostradamus, a group of experts was founded.
[11] The date to which this entry refers, falls within the period in which Krafft and Lucht signed their statement about secrecy. This is reason to assume that the entry of Goebbels deals with the foundation of a group of Nostradamus-experts, to which Krafft belonged, and Kritzinger probably also.[12]

Von Borresholm / Niehoff versus Howe

Von Borresholm / Niehoff (DE, 1949)   Howe (DE, 1995 [UK, 1984 (1967)])
p.146: the date of the attempt: November 9, 1939. X p.228: the date of the attempt: the evening preceding November 9, 1939.
p.146: on November 2, 1939, Krafft wrote a letter from a village in the Black Forest. V p.209 and p.233: from October 1937 to January 1940, Krafft and his wife were settled in Urberg in the Black Forest. From January 1940, they were settled in Berlin.
p.146: Krafft predicted that from November 7 to November 10, 1939, Hitler's life would be threatened by violence. V
p.228: Krafft predicted that from November 7 to November 10, 1939, Hitler's life would be threatened.
Howe notes that Krafft explicitly wrote that chances were that an attempt would occur, in which explosives would be used.
p.146: Krafft wrote his prediction regarding Hitler in a letter, dated on November 2, 1939, shown by Hitler to Goebbels during lunch. X p.228-229: Krafft's prediction regarding Hitler was published in a column, dated on November 2, 1939. Afther the usual circulation, Fesel, the head of Amt VII of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt, archivated this column. When on November 9, 1939, the failed attempt on Hitler became known, Krafft sent a telegram to Rudolf Heß in the Reichskanzlei, in which he referred to his column and warned that in the coming days, Hitler's life still would be in danger. Fesel was ordered to look for this column. It was submitted to Hitler, who showed it to Goebbels during breakfast.
Howe doubts if the letter of Krafft, about which Boelcke wrote, reached Hitler, and thinks it possible that this letter has been written before November 2, 1939.
p.146: as a party member, Krafft considered it his duty to ask Hitler urgently not to go unnecessarily in public, and to ensure a higher degree of security. X Howe writes nothings about Krafft being a member of the NSDAP.
p.147: for a long time, Hitler looked for a "Seni"; being an astrologer, Krafft could supply that want. X p.315-316: miss Schröder, in the period 1933-45 one of Hitler's secretaries, was convinced that Hitler did not have any interest in astrology and contested astrology by saying that people, born on the same date, time and place, not shared the same destiny.
p.147: in Urberg, Krafft worked as a translator of French books.

X

p.213: in French, Krafft wrote a manuscript, published in July 1939, entitled: Traité d'Astro-Biologie.
p.228: from October 1939, Krafft worked for Amt VII of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt as an author of Wirtschaftsberichten.
Howe wrote nothing about a professional translation of French books. 
p.147: after the attempt, Krafft was arrested by the Gestapo. V p.228-229: on November 9, 1939, Krafft was arrested in Urberg by four members of the Gestapo, who worked at the Gestapo headquarters in Freiburg. 
p.147: when it turned out that there was no evidence against Krafft, Goebbels achieved his release. X p.229: on December 10, 1939, Krafft was transported to Berlin for cross-examination by the Sicherheitsdienst. The Sicherheitsdienst released him from prison because they could not find any incriminating evidence. On November 21, 1939, Krafft attended a meeting of the German Academic Society for astrological research.
Howe wrote nothing about Goebbels' intervention to have Krafft released from prison.
p.148: Goebbels had a conversation with Krafft, in which Krafft showed a manuscript about the Centuries. X p.248: according to Georg Lucht, Krafft's typist during spring 1940, Krafft never met Goebbels.
Howe wrote nothing about the conversation between Goebbels and Krafft, mentioned by Von Borresholm and Niehoff. 
p.148-149: Goebbels became interested in the Centuries because of Krafft's comment on a quatrain, which turned out to be quatrain 05-94. X p.220-224: Goebbels became interested in the Centuries because his wife rose his attention to some lines in Kritzinger's Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (Berlin, 1922, p.136) in which quatrain 03-57 was discussed. 
p.232: in December 1939, Krafft was summoned to Berlin, because it seemed that he was the best person to study the Centuries for psychological warfare. In Berlin, Krafft did not meet Goebbels. He met Fesel, who instructed him.
p.149: Goebbels ordered Krafft to analyse Hitler's horoscope day after day and to notify Goebbels by means of a letter in case of danger. X p.273: after Heß' flight to England, rumours were spread that it was Krafft who made him do this. These rumours do not contain a single core of truth.
p.302-303: in June 1942, during their internment, Goerner and Krafft were ordered to analyse the horoscopes of important British generals.
p.149: Goebbels took care that Krafft could work at the French translation section of the Deutsche Nachrichtenbüro. X p.228 and p.250-251: from October 1939 to May/June 1940, Krafft worked for Amt VII of the Reichssicherheitshauptamt. 
p.250-251 and p.271: from May/June 1940 to June 1941, Krafft worked on the French translation section of the Deutsche Nachrichtenbüro in Berlin, where he translated German texts into French. A friend from Hamburg rose his attention to this work. Howe wrote nothing about a mediation by Goebbels.
p.271: on June 12, 1941, Krafft was arrested in Berlin as a result of the Aktion-Heß.
V Correspondence between Von Borresholm / Niehoff and Howe
X Difference between Von Borresholm / Niehoff and Howe

 

Other publications

1. Das Oberkommando der Wehrmacht gibt bekannt (Sommerfeldt, DE, 1952)
According to Von Borresholm and Niehoff, Krafft explained to Goebbels that quatrain 05-94 indicate that, because the armistice was faked, the great Leader of Armin's land would transfer Brabant, Flanders, Gent, Brugue and Boulogne to Great-Germany and would occupy in a Vienna and the Rhine region by surprise.[13]
The text of quatrain 05-94 was also included in a national-socialist propaganda writing which contained at least 33 Zenturien, written in German. Traces of this writing can be found in Das Oberkommando der Wehrmacht gibt bekannt (Martin Henry Sommerfeldt, Frankfurt am Main, 1952). Probably by the end of November 1939 or medio December 1939, this writing was discussed in a secret daily propaganda conference. In this conference, Goebbels ordered that Zenturie 33 had to be brought into circulation in the shape of an illegal chain-letter, accompanied by the oral comment that this Zenturie was linked in a magic way to 1933, the year in which the national-socialist came into power, a temporary occupation of France, the coming German supremacy and the German peace empire of 1000 years. Stalin (der große Furst aus Armenien) was preserved until Russia would declare war to Germany or vice versa.
[14] The Sommerfeldt notes do not contain a single trace of Krafft's link of le grand duc d'Armenie to Hitler or to his link of the fourth line of quatrain 05-94 to the re-militarization of the Rhine region and to Austria's Anschluß

2. The Goebbels' diaries
Since 1993, Saur Verlag, Munich, in commission of the German Institut für Zeitgeschichte and in cooperation with the Russian State Archive, publishes the scientific edition Die Tagebücher von Joseph Goebbels. This edition, which contains about 98% of the contents of the diaries which Goebbels kept from 1923 to 1945, is divided in two series: the series Aufzeichnungen (1923-1941) and the series Diktate (1941-1945).
A diary does not give a complete survey of what happened in the life of its author. The author did not record every event which occured; the things he recorded, he recorded from his personal point of view. Nevertheless, there can be tangent planes between a diary and other information sources about the life of the author.
The first time the Goebbels' diaries contain an entry on Nostradamus and the Centuries, is the entry, dated on November 22, 1939, regarding November 21, 1939. Goebbels wrote that he had to stay in bed because he had caught a cold; at night, he read Nostradamus. He considered the things he read quite interesting for Germany and hoped that the dared comments would become true; in that case, England's supremacy would be reduced to zero.[15]
Goebbels used the word "Nostradamus". He did not mention any title regarding Nostradamus and/or the Centuries. His entry regarding November 21, 1939 indicates that in the evening, he read comments which dealt with a decline of England's supremacy. One can find such a comment in Kritzingers Mysterien von Sonne und Seele, the book which, according to Kritzinger, lead Goebbels to use the Centuries for psychological warfare, and in Noah's Nostradamus - prophetische Weltgeschichte von 1547 bis gegen 3000.[16] In Einführung zu den Prophéties de Maistre Michel Nostradamus (Frankfurt am Main, 1940) Krafft points to the discussion of quatrain 03-57 by the Frenchman Nicoullaud, who for 1939 foresaw a decisive revolution in England, and to Loog, who described crises in 1939 for England and the new founded Poland. [17] However, a letter, written by Krafft to the Rumanian diplomate Viorel Virgil Tilea, dated on March 14, 1940, shows that Krafft started to write the Einführung... by the end of January / the beginning of February 1940.[18]

 

Discussion
Howe correctly described the course of events around the failed attempt on Hitler, November 1939. This can be concluded from the contents of the conversation between Howe and Kritzinger in 1961, in which Kritzinger described the way in which Krafft, through him, became involved in the production of national-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries. This happened in December 1939. The events in the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay are situated in November 1939. Normally speaking, they should have occurred in Kritzinger's story, who told that he knew Krafft very well. Next, Krafft's beginning of his Nostradamus activities in Berlin can be linked to the entry in the Goebbels' diaries regarding January 8, 1940, on which day a group of Nostradamus-experts was founded. Next, there is the communication to Tilea from which can be concluded that Krafft began to write the Einführung... around the end of January 1940 or the beginning of February 1940. This means that before this period, there was no manuscript, which means that the Goebbels entry regarding November 21, 1939, did not deal with it. Closing, there is the remark by Lucht that Krafft, as far as he knew, never met Goebbels.
As to the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay, the comments, based upon Howe's information, is as follows:

  1. Krafft made a prediction in which he described that Hitler's life would be threatened in the period between November 7 and November 10, 1939;

  2. Hitler had no interest in astrology;

  3. The day after the failed attempt, Hitler showed Krafft's prediction to Goebbels;

  4. Goebbels had no reason to keep Krafft away from Hitler;

  5. The day after the failed attempt, Krafft was arrested by the Gestapo in Freiburg and the next day brought to Berlin in order to be cross-examined by the Sicherheitsdienst;

  6. The Sicherheitsdienst released Krafft because they found no incriminating evidence. Goebbels played no part in this and had no secret conversation with Krafft, next to his release;

  7. In December 1940, Krafft was summoned to Berlin because Goebbels was looking for an expert who could study the Centuries for reasons of psychological warfare; in January 1940, Krafft signed a document in which he promised secrecy;

  8. There has been no manuscript of Kraffts Einführung..., dating from 1939; Krafft began to write the Einführung... at the beginning of 1940.

 

Some of the Von Borresholm / Niehoff sources
In the preface, the publisher of Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnung aus seiner Umgebung wrote that all events and statements were noted in diaries the very day, even the most surprising ones and the most peculiar ones. Some moment later, these diaries will be published. Von Borresholm and Niehoff also took information from sources like speeches and letters.
In the Nostradamus-essay, Von Borresholm en Niehoff described the contents of a conversation between Hitler and Goebbels on their way back to Berlin and a conversation between them the day after the failed attempt, as well as a conversation between Goebbels and Krafft, next to his release from prison in 1939. A comparison with the information, gathered by Howe, showed that there was no conversation between Goebbels and Krafft. This means that details of this conversation never have been written down in a diary the same day. Regarding the conversations between Hitler and Goebbels, it can be noted that the description of these conversations raise the impression that they took place in private, which raises the question how details of such conversations can be noted in a diary the same day. Anyway, it seems right to conclude that the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay is mainly a romanticized novel, which contains several guides: the legend of Hitler believing in astrology, the struggle for power in the top of the national-socialist organization and the legend that Krafft is ordered to analyse Hitler's horoscope day after day in order to detect danger. 
The Einführung... contains all of the elements which Von Borresholm and Niehoff attributed to Krafft regarding his comment on quatrain 05-94. In the Einführung..., Krafft explained the words La Traisue fainte  uitgelegd as a "faked armistice", the  word assaillira as "to occupy by surprise" and the word Duc as a word, derived from ducere (to lead). He linked the word Boulogne to both Boulogne and Poland and the word Armenie to Armin's Land and therefore to Germany. The linking of Boulogne to Poland dates from a later moment than the linking of Boulogne to the French city of Boulogne and is not present in the story, told by Von Borresholm and Niehoff.[19] In Comment Nostradamus a-t-il entrevu l'avenir de l'Europe?, he linked the geographical name Bolongne (in Kraffts comment: Boulogne) to Poland and therefore to the German invasion in Poland in September 1939, and the word Armenie to Germany.[20] In a leaflet, dating from May 1941, one month after the publishing of Comment Nostradamus a-t-il entrevu l'avenir de l'Europe?, Krafft mentioned both Boulogne and Poland.[21] All elements of Krafft's comment on quatrain 05-94, including an explanation of the link of Armenie to Arminie i.e. Great-Germany, can be found in the national-socialist brochure Der Seher von Salon.[22]
The old-French text of quatrain 05-94, given by Von Borresholm and Niehoff, is not taken from the Einführung..., since the Einführung... does not contain full quatrain texts, but quoted quatrain lines. The text of this quatrain, given in the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay, differs that much from the text, given in Comment Nostradamus a-t-il entrevu l'avenir de l'Europe?, that it cannot be simply said that they used that text. The table underneath contains these two texts and a German version, printed in Der Seher von Salon.

Quatrain 05-94

Krafft-1941, p.145

Von Borresholm/Niehoff, p.148

Der Seher von Salon, p.15

Translatera en la grand Germanie,
Brabant & Flãdres,Gand, Bruges,& Bolongne:
La traisue fainte,le grand duc d'Armenie,
Assaillira Vienne & la Coloigne.

Translatera en la grand Germanie,
Brabant & Flandes, Gent, Bruges,  
Boloigne:
La Traisue fainte, le grand duc d'Armenie,
Assailira Vienne et la Coloigne.

Hinübernehmen nach Großdeutschland wird,
Brabant und Flandern, Gent und Brügge, Polen - 
Vertrag war Schwindel! - Der Arminien führt,
Wird sich im Sprunge Wien und Cöllen holen.

 

Bender (1983) about the course of events around the failed attempt on Hitler
In the chapter Der Nostradamus-Boom in Zukunftsvisionen Kriegsprophezeiungen Sterbe-Erlebnisse - Aufsätze zur Parapsychologie II (Munich, 1983), the German parapsychologist Hans Bender discussed the fortune of quatrain 05-94, such as Krafft's interpretation of this quatrain. He had known Krafft quite well, had a longtime correspondence with him and helped in in 1937 to find a house in the German Black Forest. 
According to Bender, it was in the summer of 1939 that Krafft wrote a letter to the Reichskanzlei in which he warned that in November 1939, Hitler would be in danger. It was not clear to Bender whether Krafft had based himself upon astrology, a vision or both. Since the Reichskanzlei did not reply, Krafft sended a reminder in the form of a telegram, shortly before the period which he thought would be critical. Right after the failed attempt, highly ranked SD-officers came from Berlin to interrogate Krafft, who they considered to be an accomplished. After it became clear that Krafft had nothing to do with the attempt, they ordered him to go to Berlin. Behind the scenes, Kraft wrote astrological analyses of the character of prominent military persons and statesmen of the adversaries of Germany, including predictions. Goebbels heard of Krafft. Following an idea of Kritzinger, Goebbels ordered Krafft to produce a couple of hundred copies of a 1568-edition of the Centuries, accompanied by comments which for propaganda purposes would be spread in the French-speaking occupied areas. 
Bender, who also knew Howe, qualified his investigation of Krafft's explanation of quatrain 05-94 as very accurate and considered his book Urania´s Children (1967) as a historic monument.[23] Nevertheless, there are differences between Bender's version, dating from 1983, and Howe's version, dating from 1967. According to Bender, Krafft warned in a letter, dating from the summer of 1939, and in a telegram, dating from shortly before the critical period in November 1939 which Krafft had in mind. Howe wrote about an astrologic/economic/politic column in autumn 1939 and a telegram which, according to Lucht, was send after the failed attempt. 
Bender's version shows an unexpected part of Kritzinger in the production of national-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries, i.e. that Kritzinger had advised Goebbels to order Krafft to produce a couple of hundred copies of a 1568-edition of the Centuries and to write interpretations of quatrains, which were meant for the occupied French-speaking regions, but Bender did not write about Kritzinger recommending Krafft to the Propaganda Ministry as a Nostradamus-expert who was able to comment the quatrains from a propagandistic point of view. It looks as if Bender located the part which Kritzinger in 1939 played in Krafft's life, in 1940, and that he had Comment Nostradamus a-t-il entrevu l'avenir de l'Europe? in mind, Krafft's French translation of the manuscript Nostradamus sieht die Zukunft Europas, which he wrote in May-June 1940 by order of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, a translation which was meant for France and the French-speaking regions in Belgium and Switzerland. 

 

Epilogue
In his discussion of Krafft's prediction that Hitler's life would be endangered between November 7 and November 10, 1939, Howe's reference to the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay read like this:

Siehe W.A. Boelcke, Kriegspropaganda 1939-41, Stuttgart 1966, S. 223. Seine Darstellung beruht auf dem Nostradamus-Kapitel in Boris von Borresholm: Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung, 1949. Auch wenn der Kern der Geschichte richtig sein mag, ist er keine völlig verläßliche Quelle. Weder Lucht noch Goerner erwähnten, daß der Brief Hitler erreicht hat, und möglicherweise wurde er auch schon vor dem 2. November verfaßt.[24]

Howe mentions the page which includes Boelcke's summary of the Von Borresholm / Niehoff  Nostradamus-essay, but he did not mention the pages in Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnung aus seiner Umgebung. This means that he did not read this book. 
In this article, it has been demonstrated that the Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay is not correct. From a historic point of view, it is not reliable, its character is legendary. It is a pity that Howe did not observe this by himself in 1967 or 1984; he might have discussed more deeply the question if Hitler showed a letter to Goebbels or a column. Howe made no objections against Boelcke's remark that Krafft, shortly after his release, was summoned by Goebbels. This might have been caused by Boelcke's interpretation of the Nostradamus-essay (having Krafft summoned instead of having him brought to his study, next to his release).
The Von Borresholm / Niehoff Nostradamus-essay is only one of the essays in Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung. In this article, it is not intended to review the other essays.

 

De Meern, the Netherlands, February 24, 2006
T.W.M. van Berkel
updated on February 27, 2009

 

Notes
The titles, places and year of issue of the mentioned authors are listed in the bibliography.

  1. Boris von Borresholm (alternate name: Boris Borresholm, 1912-1989) was one of the co-authors of a two-volume series of books, dealing with Greek mythology. He wrote novels and movie scripts and directed movies. In 1962, he was one of the 26 subscribers of the Oberhausener Manifest, who plead to leave the old German movie tradition behind in order to produce short movies, free of conventions and commercial influences. Von Borresholm also was the editor-in-chief of the Berlin brochure Journal, of which in 1948 4 issues were published, with at least one contribution by Karena Niehoff. 
    Karena Niehoff (1920-1992) was of Jewish origin. In February 1943, she was sentenced to prison for six months because of manipulating ration coupons. During her imprisonment, she wrote, together with two inmates, anti-Nazi flyers. In the fist half of 1944, she was interned two times. From August 1944 until May 1945, she went into hiding. Between May 18 and July 15, 1945, she kept a diary, which impressed its readers very deeply. 
    After the war, Niehoff became known as a film journalist and was a correspondent of the Berliner Tagesspiegel and the Süddeutsche Zeitung.
     In 1949, she testified against Veit Harlan, who in an anti-Semitical sense had elaborated Ludwig Metzger's original script of the film Jud Suss (in 1940-'41, she was Metzger's assistant). 
    On the title page of Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung, it reads:
    Herausgegeben unter Mitarbeit von Karena Niehoff von Boris v. Borresholm. In this article, the text of Dr. Goebbels nach Aufzeichnungen aus seiner Umgebung is attributed to both Von Borresholm and Niehoff, although it is not clear which parts each of them wrote.
    [text]

  2. Actually, the attempt took place on November 8, 1939, about 21:20. See for examle: H. Molier: Aanslag op Hitler, 8 november 1939. [text]

  3. "Seni": name variant of Giovanni Battisto Seno (Zenno), 1600-1656; Italian astrologer, personal physician of Wallenstein (Albrecht Wenzel Eusebius von Waldstein), the Commander-in-Chief of the German Imperial Troops at the time of the Thirty-Year-War. [text]   

  4. Von Borresholm / Niehoff, p.147: Er erwirkt die Freilassung Kraffts und läßt diesen zum Wilhelmplatz bestellen. The word bestellen has several meanings, among which to bring and to summon. In my idea, Von Borresholm and Niehoff meant to bring. Boelcke interpreted this word as to summon (...Wenig später wurde Krafft zu Goebbels beordert [...], Boelcke-1966, p.223). [text]  

  5. Von Borresholm / Niehoff, p.148. The old-French text is the text of quatrain 05-94. [text]   

  6. Boelcke-1966, p.223-224. In Boelcke's Wollt Ihr den totalen Krieg - Die geheimen Goebbels-Konferenzen 1939-43 (Herrsching, 1989 [1967]), a selection from the minutes of the secret daily propaganda conferences in the period 1939-1943, there is a summary of the minutes of November 11, 1939. This summary does not include the summary of the Nostradamusparagraph, written by Von Borresholm and Niehoff. [text]

  7. Howe, p.228-229, note 3. [text]

  8. Howe, p.143 ff.; Boelcke-1966, p.241. In his explanation, Boelcke writes that despite Hitler's decision, astrology was highly estimated in some executive NSDAP-quarters. They were convinced that astrological principles regarding the precise calculation of a horoscope profoundly were connected with the national-socialist view of the world and answered to the national-socialist idea about fate. [text] 

  9. Howe, p.220-223. See also Van Berkel:
    - The 1939-fortune of Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (dr. H.-H. Kritzinger, DE, 1961)
    - Quatrain 03-57 and Die Weissagungen des Nostradamus (C. Loog, Pfullingen in Württenberg, 1921 [1920]) [text]

  10. Howe, p.233. [text

  11. Fröhlich, p.263. Goebbels always wrote his diary entries one day later. [text] 

  12. Van Berkel: The 1939-fortune of Mysterien von Sonne und Seele (dr. H.-H. Kritzinger, DE, 1961). [text]  

  13. Von Borresholm en Niehoff did not explain Kraffts comment. [text]

  14. Sommerfeldt, p.56-57. See also Van Berkel: Das Oberkommando der Wehrmacht gibt bekannt (M.H. Sommerfeldt, Frankfurt am Main, 1952). Zenturie 33 is a united, edited version of the  quatrains 05-94 and 10-42 in Nostradamus - prophetische Weltgeschichte von 1547 bis gegen 3000 (Bruno Noah, Berlin, 1928). [text]

  15. Fröhlich, p.206. [text]

  16. Kritzinger-1922a, p.137 (basing himself upon quatrain 10-100, Kritzinger expected the decline of England in either the second half of the 20th century or between 2010 and 2040); Noah, p.157. [text]

  17. Krafft-1940b, p.XXV. [text]

  18. Howe, p.241. [text]

  19. Krafft-1940b, p.VII, p.XVIII-XIX and p.XXII-XXIII. In Nostradamus sieht die Zukunft Europas, a manuscript which is older than the final version of the Einführung..., Bologne is only linked to the French city of Boulogne (Krafft 1940c, p.62). [text]

  20. Krafft-1941-FR (1940c), p.145-147. [text]

  21. Howe, p.255. [text]

  22. Brochure-38-DE, p.14-16. [text]

  23. Bender, p.47-49. [text]

  24. Howe, p.228-229, note 3. [text]

 
 

 
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