NOSTRADAMUS, ASTROLOGY AND THE BIBLE
SUBSTUDY "WORLD WAR II"
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? een belangwekkende en actueele beschouwing op grond der voorspellingen van Michel Nostradamus gegeven in "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties"; samengesteld uit de nagelaten geschriften van Jean François Pasteur (+) (The Hague, 1940)
- T.W.M. van Berkel -

Nederlandse versie
 

Omslag "Pasteur"
"Pasteur"-1940

In connection with April 24, 1940, dr. Paul Joseph Goebbels, from 1933 to 1945 minister of Propaganda in Nazi-Germany, wrote that the " Nostradamus-brochure" was published in the Netherlands and Switzerland and was quite sensational.[1] On this website, it is assumed that with the mentioning of the brochure in the Netherlands, Goebbels meant the Dutch version of Was bringt das Jahr 1940? Die Antwort geben uns "Les vrayes Centuries et Propheties de Maistre Michel Nostradamus", a national-socialist text, written in November - December 1939 by Hans-Wolfgang Herwarth von Bittenfeld, prof. dr. Karl Bömer and Leopold Gutterer, managers at the Ministry of Propaganda. In this Dutch version, entitled Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? een belangwekkende en actueele beschouwing op grond der voorspellingen van Michel Nostradamus gegeven in "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties"; samengesteld uit de nagelaten geschriften van Jean François Pasteur (+), the year 1940 is mentioned as the year of publishing.[2] On this website, this version is entitled Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?; the word "Pasteur" is a reference to this brochure.
On April 12, 1940, the Swiss astrologer Karl Ernst Krafft, who from January 1940 would start to produce national-socialist propaganda, based upon the Centuries, ordered four copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. On April 29, these were sent to him from the Netherlands.[3] From copy figure data of the VGB (Vereenigde Grafische Bedrijven), where Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was produced, it can be derived that the printing of this brochure was achieved on April 18, 1940.
According to a report about the activities of the Ausland section of the Ministry of Propaganda in the period January 1 - August 31 1940, written by dr. Ernst Brauweiler, head of this section, 5.000 copies were printed of a Dutch edition of a Nostradamus-writing which was translated in eight languages with a total of 83.000 circulating copies.[4] On this website, it is assumed that Brauweiler’s report contained a.o. the copy figure of the first edition of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, which was spread in April 1940. From copy figure data of the VGB, it can be derived that 5.175 copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were printed. After the capitulation of the Netherlands on May 15, 1940, the Ausland section of the Ministry of Propaganda ordered the production of another 3.000 copies.[5] 
The title of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? contains a reference to Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties. This is, as can be derived from a remark on page 41, a reference to the photocopy of the 1668-Amsterdam-edition, made by the Frenchman P.V. Piobb in 1927. In Was bringt das Jahr 1940?, Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s. included a number of French quatrain texts from this photocopy in order to raise the impression that they translated these quatrain texts and studied them..

 

Willem Johan Ort, 1924
Willem Johan Ort, 1924

Arie Meijer Schwencke
Arie Meijer Schwencke

De waarheid marcheert...
De waarheid marcheert...
W.J. Ort, The Hague

Willem Johan Ort, publisher of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and Arie Meijer Schwencke, owner of the Vereenigde Grafische Bedrijven and printer of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was published by Willem Johan Ort. In 1940, his company was seated in the Prins Hendrikstraat 84 in The Hague.
[6] In 1918, Ort, born on October 20, 1881 in Delft as a son of a tailor and deceased in The Hague on June 24, 1951, opened a bookstore in The Hague, together with P. van Straaten. This bookstore, named "Ort, Van Straaten", was a continuation of the bookstore of M. van der Beek (The Hague) en Van Straaten's bookstore (Rotterdam). In 1925, the bookstore "Ort, Van Straaten" was continued as "W.J. Ort, The Hague", a one-man business. On July 15, 1936, he celebrated his 40-year jubilee as a bookseller.
Ort's bookstore and publishing company existed until the first years of World War II. In 1946, the company was handed over to his son Johannes Jan Coenraad, who continued the company until 1964 but, as far as known, did not publish any books.
[7] 
In 1928, Arie Meijer Schwencke (Arie Meijer, born in The Hague on July 26, 1906, who named himself Arie Meijer Schwencke, Schwencke was his mother's family name) founded two press agencies, which in the beginning of the thirties were fused under the company name NV Vereenigde Pers Bureaux (VPB). After Hitler came into power in 1933, Meijer Schwencke got in contact with Otto Dietrich, Reichspressechef. This contact resulted in print orders, articles, propaganda material and financial support of a.o. the Propaganda section of the Wehrmacht and the Auslandspressebüro, led by Geheimrat dr. Walther Heide, an office which was part of Abteilung IVb (Auslandspresse) of the Ministry of Propaganda, led by Bömer, where Herwarth von Bittenfeld worked.
Meijer Schwencke, who meanwhile had also founded the VGB (Vereenigde Grafische Bedrijven, a printer's company) started to look for a "sleeping" publishing company that could serve to spread the propaganda brochures, produced by the VGB. In the summer of 1939, one of his employees, A. Storm van Leeuwen, contacted Ort, whose company had become almost completely inactive. Ort refused to sell his company to the VGB, but gave
permission to use his company's name for the publishing of about ten pro-German propaganda brochures, with a recompensation of f 100,- for each title. These brochures were printed by the VGB. On December 28, 1939, the printing of 10.000 copies of De waarheid marcheert..., the first brochure, was achieved. This brochure was a translation of Das Oberkommando der Wehrmacht gibt bekannt...: Wahrheit und Lüge über die September-Feldzug 1939; auf Grund amtliches Material zusammengestellt (dr. Werner Robert Valentin Picht, Berlin, 1939). On January 27, 1940, the printing of 5.000 copies of the brochure Kan Engeland den oorlog winnen? - De Zeeoorlog en de neutralen was achieved. This brochure was a translation of one of the four volumes in the series Vår neutralität, written by baron dr. Lage Fabian Wilhelm Staël von Holstein (Stockholm, 1939), who in the first quarter of 1940 would translate the brochure, written by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s., into Swedish; in the second quarter of 1940, he would translate this brochure into English. Staël von Holstein had contacted Meijer Schwencke with the request to have his brochure about England translated and spread. On March 3, 1940, the printing of 5.000 copies of Tsjecho-Slowakije, slachtoffer der westersche mogendheden, written by the Czech colonel Emanuel Moravec, was achieved. On April 18, 1940, the printing of 5.175 copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was achieved
After the capitulation of the Netherlands on May 15, 1940, the publication of this kind national-socialist propaganda was continued with e.g. the brochure De ondergang van een imperium - over de "teloorgang" van het Engelse wereldrijk, a translation of Decline and fall of the British Empire (Robert Stephen Briffault, Prague, 1940), with an introduction by Tobie Goedewaagen, chairman of the Board of Enlightenment of the Dutch Press and later secretary-general of the Ministry of People's Enlightenment and Arts, the Dutch pendant of the German Ministry of Propaganda.
[8]
On May 5, 1945, the liberation of the Netherlands was achieved. On May 17, 1945, Ort was suspended as a book trader and publisher because of, as it was phrased, unworthy behaviour during the years in which the Netherlands were occupied. In 1946, the Council for Press Purification banned Ort as a publisher for six months.
The articles in the Dutch Nieuwsblad voor den Boekhandel about Ort's banning do not contain information about a membership of the NSB, the Dutch national-socialist movement, or another national-socialist organization. Meier Schwencke was arrested in June 1946. In an article in the issue of April 18, 9141 of the Dutch daily Het Vaderland, he was mentioned in his quality of SS-Unterscharfüher. In 1942, due to malversations, he fell into disgrace with the Germans. His companies were confiscated. In 1943, he started to work for Het Parool, an illegal resistance newspaper. After the war, he worked for some time for the Dutch National Security Office. In May 1951, Meijer Schwencke was sentenced to 7 years and 6 months imprisonment to begin from the time of arrest, of which 2 years and 2 months on probation (which meant that he would be released in October 1951). Further, he was banned for 20 years as director of press agencies and publishing companies and an amount of f 25.000 of his private capital was confiscated.

According to the Goebbels diaries, Brauweiler, the head of the Ausland section of the Ministry of Propaganda, was responsible for "bringing" the Nostradamus-brochure to the neutral countries.
[9] The word "bringing" means: looking abroad for translators and for printers and publishers who were willing to print and to spread the translations of these brochures. Neither the Goebbels diaries, nor the minutes of the secret daily propaganda conferences on Goebbels' Ministry of Propaganda, show which employee of the Ministry of Propaganda contacted Meijer Schwencke in order to have the brochure, written by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s., translated into Dutch and spread in The Netherlands.

 

Contents
In Was bringt das Jahr 1940?, the text is divided in two parts: an untitled part about the life and work of Nostradamus and predictions in the Centuries which are fulfilled, and a part, entitled Gegenwart und Zukunft, in which predictions in the Centuries are discussed which deal with the actual situation and the future. In Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, the text is divided in four parts. The Voorwoord (preface) and the Aanhangsel (appendix) are not part of Was bringt das Jahr 1940?.

"Berlijn"

"Pasteur"

Voorwoord bij het verschijnen van een actueele verklaring der voorspellingen van den grooten Franschen Ziener Michel Nostradamus

ongetiteld deel

Verleden, heden en toekomst op wonderbaarlijke wijze voorspeld door den Franschman Michel Nostradamus in zijn "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties"

Gegenwart und Zukunft

Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? Een antwoord op de vele belangrijke vraagstukken, die ons bezighouden, gegeven door "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus"

Aanhangsel - Verklaringen

In the next listing, the contents of each part of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? are summarized. The corresponding texts in Was bringt das Jahr 1940? ("Berlin", the original German text), Sta nam donosi 1940? ("Belgrade"), Le profezie del Maestro Michele Nostradamus anno 1558 ("Genoa"), Nostradamus spådomar om kriget ("Norab"-1940a), What will happen in the near future? ("Norab"-1940b),Que se passera-t-il entre le printemps 1940 et le printemps 1941 ("Rossier"- 1940b)  and Što se dogadjalo i što će se dogoditi (Zagreb) are also mentioned.


Voorwoord bij het verschijnen van een actueele verklaring der voorspellingen van den grooten Franschen Ziener Michel Nostradamus (p.5-6)
In this voorwoord (tr.: preface) the anonymous translator explaines that he found a study on the prophecies of Nostradamus in the inheritance of his deceased friend Jean François Pasteur. By publication, he wanted to help the millions of people who were tormented by the question what would be the end of the war which recently had begun. 
Corresponding texts: none.


Verleden, heden en toekomst op wonderbaarlijke wijze voorspeld door den Franschman Michel Nostradamus in zijn "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties" (p.9-23)
Nostradamus predicted the decease in 1559 of Henry II. Short description of the life of Nostradamus.
Under the roof of his house, Nostradamus made a room in which he wrote the Centuries. The origins of his "visions". Kings visiting his tomb in the Minor Friar church in Salon. Nostradamus predicts in detail: in one of the quatrains in the 9th century, he gave the names of general Montmorency and the soldier who executed him in 1632 in Toulouse. Further, he predicted the arrest in 1792 of Louis XVI, the invention of the air balloon and matters concerning pope Pius VI. Nostradamus wrote more or less a dozen quatrains about Napoleon Bonaparte. Further, he predicted the way in which Napoleon III would die in London and the way in which the Italian king Umberto would die because of an attempt. Predictions about World War I, the failure of the League of Nations and the rise of Mussolini.
Corresponding texts:

"Belgrade" p. 3-10 Predictions of the death of a king
King of magic
His predictions and their features
Unveiling the future
From Napoleon to Umberto
The World War 1914-1918
"Berlin" p.1-14
"Genoa" p.5-15 Une terrible evento
Un maestro del regno della magia
Le profezie di Nostradamus et le loro caratteristiche
L'Avvenire svelato
De Napoleone Bonaparte a Re Umberto
Dalla guerra mondiale alle S.d.N. all'impresa etiopica
"Norab"-1940a p.7-26 ch. II. Nostradamus debut
ch. III. Fjärrskådaren utvecklas
ch. IV. Hur kommo ingivelserna?
ch. V. Fyra hundra års erfarenheter
ch. VI. Spådomen om Ludvig XVI
ch. VII. Profetior om Napoleon
ch. VIII. Kung Umberto
ch. IX. Nostradamus om världskriget
"Norab"-1940b p.6-43

ch. II. A Dramatic Accident
ch. III. Some dates
ch. IV. Nostradamus develops his Gift of Prophecy
ch. V. The "Voices" from Heaven 
ch. VI. A prediction made Four Hundred Years before the event
ch. VII. The Tragedy of Louis XVI 
ch. VIII. Astonishing Prophecies about Napoleon 
ch. IX. The Great War

"Rossier"-1940b p.1-4 Une mort prophétisée
Un maitre dans le royaume de la magie
Ses prophéties et leurs particularités
L'avenir dévoilé
De Napoléon Bonaparte au roi Humbert
Prophéties sur la Guerre Mondiale de 1914-18
"Zagreb" p.1-9 Prorokovana smrt
Majstor u oblasti magije
Njegova prorocanstva i njihove osebnosti
Razotkrivena buducnost
Od Napoleona Bonaparta do kralja Humberta
Prorocanstva o svjetkom ratu 1914-18


Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? Een antwoord op de vele belangrijke vraagstukken, die ons bezighouden gegeven door "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus" (p.24-37)
Introduction to the actual situation, caused by the new war, and the uncertain fate which is connected with this. Quotes regarding England, taken from De Fontbrune's Les prophéties de Maistre Michel Nostradamus. Expliquées et commentées  (1939 [1938], fifth edition).
Discussion of quatrain 03-57 because of the coming fall of England and the German invasion in Poland. The backgrounds of the link between quatrain 03-57 and the German invasion in Poland in 1939. Further: discussion of the quatrains 02-75 and 02-100 and other predictions which show the coming fall of England.
Birth and rise of Hitler. The "Holy Empire" comes to Germany when England lost all of its support in the world. Nostradamus predicted the Molotov - Von Ribbentrop pact.
Closing, it is argued that the prophecies of Nostradamus are very important and can be understood very easily. Millions of people consulted them in the past, among who great persons like Napoleon. The question is if Nostradamus also this time will have predicted correctly. The readers are able to verify this by themselves.
Corresponding texts:

"Belgrade" p.10-16 The present and the future
"Berlin" p.14-26 Gegenwart und Zukunft
"Genoa" p.16-24 Sguardo sul presente e sull'avvenire
Le sette metamorfosi dell'Inghilterra
Attorno alla liquidazione della grande questione
E la sorte della Germania?
Conclusione
"Norab"-1940a p.27-44 ch. X: Vad skall hånda i morgon?
ch. XI: Englands fall
ch. XII: Bekräftelser på britternas nederlag
ch. XIII: Än mer om England
ch. XIV: Tysklands triumf
ch. XV: Den tysk-ryska pakten
ch. XVI: Vår tids profet
"Norab"-1940b p.44-62 ch. X: The present and the future
ch. XI: England's fateful Hour
ch. XII: The far-reaching consequences of the current War
ch. XIV: Germany victorious in the gigantic Struggle
"Rossier"-1940b p.4-6 Un coup d'oeil sur l'avenir
Les sept changements de l'Angleterre
La France ne sera pas touchée
Autour de la grande liquidation
Et le sort de l'Allemagne?
"Zagreb" p.9-16 Pogled u buducnost
Sedam promjena Engleske
Francuska ne ce biti pogodjena
Oko velike likvidacije
A sudbina Njemacke?


Aanhangsel - verklaringen (p.39-45)
The aanhangsel (tr.: appendix) contains French quatrain texts of the quatrains 01-35, 01-36, 01-01, 01-02, 09-34, 05-57, 03-35, 01-60, 07-13 (on page 19 erroneously numbered as VIII, 13), 05-28, 03-13, 02-68, 08-60 and 01-47, all originating from the 1938-Piobb-copy, further French quatrain texts of the quatrains 02-75, 02-100 and 02-83, copied from De Fontbrunes Les prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus - Expliquées et commentées (1939 [1938]), a number of quotes from this book and the French quatrain text of quatrain 01-99.
Corresponding texts: none.

 

miniatuur in voorwoord "Pasteur"Design and illustrations
Brauweiler's report on the copy figures of the Nostradamus brochure shows that these brochures were not printed in Germany and next exported, but printed abroad and spread abroad. 
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is the finest brochure of all brochures, discussed on this website, which contain a translation of the text, written by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s. The design was bound. The backside of the title page contained the remark that 100 numbered copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were printed on old-Dutch paper, bought at Van Gelder Zonen paper factories, seated in Wormer. The copy which I possess, is not numbered.
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? has a dust jacket, made of full-bleached parchment, on which the title was printed  in red and black characters. The parchment was bought at G.H. Bührmannn factories, seated in Amsterdam. In the brochure, a multitude of character sizes has been used and a multitude of character profiles: normal, emphasized, italic, bold and small-caps characters. In Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, the lines which in Was bringt das Jahr 1940 are underlined, are printed in italic.
The first character of the first line of the three chapters in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is a miniature (decoration character). The miniature -I- in the preface is decorated with the twelve signs of the Zodiac; the other two chapters contain the miniature -H-, decorated with stems.
Like the text in Was bringt das Jahr 1940?, the text in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is divided in two chapters. In the first chapter, entitled
Verleden, heden en toekomst op wonderbaarlijke wijze voorspeld door den Franschman Michel Nostradamus in zijn "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties", quatrains are linked to events which occurred in the past. In the second chapter, entitled Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? Een antwoord op de vele belangrijke vraagstukken, die ons bezighouden gegeven door "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus", quatrains are discussed which are linked to the actual situation and the future. Probably, this division is related to the message that Nostradamus' predictions about the future most likely will be fulfilled, since in the past so many of his predictions were fulfilled.
The preface and the appendix in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? do not occur in any other brochure, neither do they occur in Was bringt das Jahr 1940?. More than twenty footnotes refer to the appendix, which contains French quatrain texts and quotes from De Fontbrune's Les prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus - Expliquées et commentées. Most of the French quatrain texts can be found in the appendix, except for the texts of the quatrains  09-18, 10-100, 03-57, 08-37, 02-78, 03-32, 03-71, 08-97, 02-85, 03-58 and the first line of quatrain 10-31. In the other brochures, footnotes occur only once. The question is if these footnotes and an appendix with French quatrain texts and quotes from the book by De Fontbrune were part of the German source text, written by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s. It is hard to believe that a translator would take the trouble to create footnotes and to compile an appendix; it is also hard to believe that the VGB, the printer, did something like this. 

arms of Paris
City crest of Paris

title page
Title page
engravure 1668-Amsterdam-edition
Engraving 
1668-Amsterdam-edition
portrait Nostradamus
Portrait Nostradamus

Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? contains four illustrations. On the cover, the city crest of Paris is depicted. On page 2, this is motivated with the remark that it was the capital of France where Maistre Michel Nostradamus had his greatest achievements. 
On page 1, a cut-out is depicted of the title of the 1668-Amsterdam-edition; on page 3, the engraving is depicted of the cover of this edition. The cut-out is a copy of the picture on the cover of the photocopy of the 1668-Amsterdam-edition (on this website, this copy is entitled the "1938-Piobb-copy"), made in 1938 by the French Century-scholar P.V. Piobb. The picture of the engraving is also taken from the 1938-Piobb-copy. On page 41 in the appendix was written that this copy was used as a source text. 
Op pagina 7, a portrait of Nostradamus is depicted, painted by his son Cesar. This portrait can also be found on page 3 in Nostradamus spådomar om kriget, the Swedish translation of the text, written by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s. in November - December 1939. This portrait is taken from the 1938-Piobb-copy. Page 24 of that brochure contains a picture of the lower half of the engraving of the 1668-Amsterdam-edition.
The title page not only contains a picture of the title of the 1668-Amsterdam-edition, but also the remark Naar een authentieke uitgave uit het jaar 1688 door JEAN FRANÇOIS PASTEUR (+) voorzien van een actueele verklaring mede op grond van een studie van den Franschen Nostradamus-kenner Dr. DE FONTBRUNE. Actually, the mentioned year 1688 should be 1668, in which J.J. van Waesberge published the 1668-Amsterdam-edition.
The picture of the first page of Century 01 in the Italian translation of the text by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s. or a cut-out, depicted in the English and Swedish translation, does not occur in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.

 

The preface and the identity of Jean François Pasteur
The preface in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? consists of two pages. At the end of the preface, it reads DE VERTALER (tr.: the translator). Not once in the preface or the text of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, the name of this translator is given.
The mentioning of a translator is part of the construction which has been used to introduce Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. In his preface, the translator wrote that a French friend left a number of writings, among which a study on the prophecies of Nostradamus, which he probably finished shortly before his death. The translator considered the contents of this study important enough to have it published as soon as possible. Therefore, the preface explains the remark samengesteld uit de nagelaten geschriften van Jean François Pasteur (+) (tr.: compiled from Jean François Pasteur's leftover writings) in the title of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. We notice that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? has a double French signature: the one of Pasteur's leftover writings and the one of De Fontbrune's Les prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus - Expliquées et commentées. It looks as if the translator is a Dutchman.
In an early phase of the study of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? , the French Century-scholar Robert Benazra, the compiler of Répertoire Chronologique Nostradamique (Paris, 1990), wrote that he never heard about a French Century-scholar named Jean François Pasteur and never read his Century-comment. Together with the national-socialist signature of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, the supposition in this early phase was that the name Jean François Pasteur was a fictitious name. This supposition was confirmed by the fact that research showed that this preface was not part of Was bringt das Jahr 1940? or the Croation, English, French, Italian, Serb or Swedish version.
[10]  

 

The propaganda message in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?
In fact, the propaganda message in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is the same as the one in the German source text, written by Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s.: England no longer would be a supreme power, she would lose her support and fall. Germany would become the new superpower. A long time ago, this was predicted by Nostradamus, whose predictions time after time turned out to be reliable. The neutral countries would witness this gigantic struggle.
About one month before the invasion, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was published in the Netherlands. It is obvious that Goebbels wanted to demoralize the Dutch. It must be noted that in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, no specific attention was given to Dutch circumstances or history, in contrast with e.g. Que se passera-t-il entre le printemps 1940 et le printemps 1941?, in which one of the chapter titles indicated that France would not be harmed by the war.

 

A missing fragment
The second chapter of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, in which by means of the Centuries the imminent future of Europe is described, begins with the phrasing of the question what tomorrow will bring, a common question which because of the war which began in 1939, suddenly got an extraordinary importance.
The pages 14 and 15 of Was bringt das Jahr 1940? contain a fragment in which Herwarth von Bittenfeld c.s. discuss the omnipresent desire of man to see into the future. This fragment is not included in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. One can only guess why. In the post-war administration of justice, Meijer Schwencke told had he edited translations of German propaganda brochures in order to minimalize or neutralize their propaganda. It is questionable if omitting this fragment minimized or neutralized the propagandistic impact of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen. The message in Was bringt das Jahr 1940? that the downfall of Great-Britain was imminent, as was the leading role of Germany (together with the Soviet-Union), was integrally translated into Dutch. Further, the title and subtitle of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? contain two references which raise the impression that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was translated from the French. The first reference is the reference to a study of the deceased Frenchman Jean-François Pasteur. The second reference is a reference to De Fontbrune's Les Prophéties de Maistre Michel Nostradamus - Expliquées et commentées. These references were made in order to prevent readers from thinking that this brochure originally was a German one. To this, we add that the preface of the translator introduction of Jean-François Pasteur have been Dutch inventions, since they do not occur in Was bringt das Jahr 1940?.

(Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, p. 24, first line)
For us, living in the present, the things which Nostradamus told about the past, are already history... for the seer of Salon all these things were ahead of him in the distant future, as we have seen. For the seer, it makes no difference if he locates his prophecies a hundred years or a thousand years in the future or even further away. But for the common people who inhabit the earth, only one question is important: what will be tomorrow? What will be in the next year? And what next?

(ontbrekend fragment [Was bringt das Jahr 1940?, p.14-15])
Hier ruht der Angelpunkt aller Prophetie. Ob sich jemand mit der Handlesekunst befasst oder mit der Schädelkunde, ob er sehnsuchtig nach dem Lauf der Sterne blickt, ob er Karten legt oder ob er, wie es die Alten getan haben, das Orakel befragt: Stets beschäftigt ihn vor allem eine einzige Frage. Es ist die Frage nach der Zukunft.

Was war, was sich in der Vergangenheit abgespielt hat, wissen wir. Es nützt uns nichts mehr - es sei denn, dass wir aus Erfahrung klug werden, oder auch nicht. Aber immer wieder greift der Mensch, hoffend, zagend, gläubig oder zweifelnd in die Zukunft. Werden wir sie je ergründen können? Gibt es eine Vorherbestimmung des Schicksals? Oder liegt alles, was kommen wird, nur in unserer eigenen Hand, in unserem eigenen Willen?

Die Antwort ist längst gegeben. Der Sterne Lauf ist festgelegt. Keine Macht auf dieser Welt vermag ihre Bahn zu ändern. Nicht der Wille der Menschen - das Schicksal waltet, jetzt und immerdar. Das Schicksal aber sucht sich seine Werkzeuge: Menschen und Dinge, und mit diesen Werkzeugen schafft es die Erfüllung.

Das Buch der Bücher, die Heilige Schrift, schliesst mit Offenbarungen. Sie sind nichts anderes als die Abzeichnung des Schicksals der Menschheit. Jeder gläubige Christ weiss, dass der Herrgott sein Schicksal bereits bestimmt hat. Die Kirche selbst hat ihr Lehrgebäude auf dieser Grundlage errichtet.

Was kommen muss, wird kommen! Die Menschen sind nur das armselige Werkzeug einer höheren Macht. Wenigen Grossen des Geistes und der Seele war es vergönnt, den Schleier der Zukunft zu lüften. Die Umwelt steht fassungslos vor dieser Sehergabe. Aber diese Grossen haben schauen dürfen. Und uns bleibt nichts anderes, als dass wir uns, ob wir wollen oder nicht, den Gesichtern der Grossen gläubig unterwerfen.

(Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, p. 24, second line)
There is war in Europe. It casts its shadows over the whole world. Not one nation, also when it is not involved in this war, has been kept free from its fury. Millions of people live in fear because of the future of their nation, because of their own fate. What will happen? Who will win? And what will be next?
Nostradamus, whose unique prophetic gift has proven itself so many times, helps humanity also this time. Like with admirable certainty he described the most important events of the past three centuries, he gives the answers to those questions which nowadays are in the mind of the nations.

 

The fortune of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?
A couple of times, material, originating from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? has been used in other publications.

a. Voorspellingen die uitgekomen zijn... (De Tombre, Arnhem, 1941)
On page 8 in the first chapter of Voorspellingen die uitgekomen zijn..., entitled Inleiding - waarheid en zekerheid, geboren helderziendheid [...], contains a reference to the Nostradamus-scholar Jean François Pasteur, deceased in 1940, who in a small brochure, entitled Hoe zal de oorlog eindigen? studied the predictions of Nostradamus about the present situation. Voorspellingen die uitgekomen zijn... is the Dutch translation of a national-socialist text, written by the German historian/philologist dr. phil. Alexander Max Centgraf (1893-1970), who in his post-war publications on Nostradamus used the pseudonym dr. N. Alexander Centurio. The question is if the references to Pasteur in the first chapter in Voorspellingen die uitgekomen zijn... and to the air raids on Rotterdam were inserted for the Dutch readers. On the pages 7-8, one can read the remark Ik heb wel eens gehoord dat zij, die, zooals ik, in Maart geboren zijn, van de Voorzienigheid dit bijzonder charisma (= genadegift) ontvangen hebben (tr.: Once I heard that Providence gave this special charism (gift of grace) to those who, like me, were born in March). This remark was made in connection with a claim to possess the gift of clairvoyance. Centgraf was born in Thale (Harz) on March 8, 1893.

b. Oorlogsvoorspellingen... (dr. W.H.C. Tenhaeff, The Hague, 1948 [1947])
After the liberation in 1945, the Dutch parapsychologist dr. W.H.C. Tenhaeff did research on what PSI-gifted persons in the Netherlands had "seen" in connection with the beginning and the course of the war by means of proscopy (experiencing or observing future events by means of PSI). The results of this research were published in Oorlogsvoorspellingen... In this book, comments on the Centuries were also discussed as well as Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? According to Tenhaeff, who acknowledged the national-socialist nature of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, this brochure was published after May 1940.[11] Actually, this brochure was published on most lately April 12, 1940. It is quite possible that Tenhaeff had a copy of the second edition, which was produced after the capitulation of the Netherlands on May 15, 1940.

c. Nostradamus De grootste ziener aller tijden (J. Vandervoort, Amsterdam, 1998)
Nostradamus De grootste ziener aller tijden, published in 1998, was a modernized version of the Dutch translation of the Centuries, made in 1941 by mr. dr. H. Houwens Post, a translation which was a counter-reaction to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. Jan Vandervoort, who revised Houwens Post's translation, added material such as a biography on Nostradamus, descriptions of predictions which were fulfilled, abused or sometimes interpreted in a hilarious way and prescriptions for pills, tonics and beauty devices. 
A comparison between Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and Nostradamus De grootste ziener aller tijden has shown that from the chapter Verleden, heden en toekomst op wonderbaarlijke wijze voorspeld door den Franschman Michel Nostradamus in zijn "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties" (Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, p.9-23), Vandervoort copied the explanation of quatrains as well as their their translation in Dutch in his chapter Wonderbaarlijke interpretaties en 'uitgekomen' voorspellingen, i.e. the quatrains 01-01, 01-02, 01-35, 01-36, 01-47, 01-60, 02-68, 02-75, 02-100, 03-13, 03-35, 03-58, 05-28, 05-57, 06-20, 07-13, 08-60, 09-18 and 09-34.
[12]

 

Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in daily's and newspapers in June - November 1940
In a number of Dutch regional daily's and newspapers in the period June - August 1940, one or more articles were published in which Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was discussed.
These articles can be divided into three groups.

a. Articles, included in pages, delivered by a press agency
Back in the thirties, the major national and regional daily newspapers were most of the time well equipped. They disposed of a large editorial staff, a network of contributors and subscriptions to national and foreign press agencies. The small newspapers could not afford this. In order to keep their costs low, they often used prefabricated pages which some press agencies produced.[13] The pages in the editions of June 14, 1940 of De Soester Courant and Nieuws- en advertentieblad Frisia and the edition of June 15, 1940 of the Texelsche Courant which contained a discussion of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, are an example of this. In the edition of June 14, 1940 of De Soester Courant, on the upper right side of page 2, in the section De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week a discussion of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was printed, with at its right side in Het portret van de week a picture of the French general Maxime Weygand, with comment. The section De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week covered the upper half of page. The lower half of this page contained articles in the sections Deze week in Nederland and De wereld in kaart. All these sections were also present on page 4 of the edition of June 14, 1940 of Nieuws en advertentieblad Frisia, with the same layout and contents as in De Soester Courant. In the edition of June 15, 1940 of the Texelsche Courant, the section De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week, containing the discussion of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, was printed on the lower half of page 5. The articles in the section Deze week in Nederland and De wereld in kaart were printed on the upper half of this page. 
In my opinion, the page with the sections De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week, Deze week in Nederland and De wereld in kaart was a pre-fab page, delivered by a press agency. The production of this page dates from before the German invasion in the Netherlands in May 1940. The first time this page was published in De Soester Courant, was in the edition of October 6, 1936. The first time this page was published in Frisia, was in the edition of June 2, 1939. The first time this page was published in the Texelsche Courant, was in the edition of June 6, 1940. The question which now rises is if the article about Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in De Soester Courant, Frisia and the Texelsche Courant was compiled by the press agency who produced the pre-fab page, or if this article was delivered to the press agency by an external source. The article about Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in the edition of June 15, 1940 of De Drie Meren happens to be identical with the article in the editions of De Soester Courant and Frisia of June 14, 1940 and the edition of the Texelsche Courant of June 15, 1940, but was an independent article, not included in a pre-fab page with the sections De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week, Deze week in Nederland and De wereld in kaart.

b. Fragments of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?
In June 1940, the RvV (Raad van Voorlichting der Nederlandsche Pers - tevens orgaan tot voorbereiding eener Nederlandsche Perskamer) was founded in The Hague, NL, due to an initiative of Meijer Schwencke. This council aimed to get the Dutch press in line with the German press, as a part of the process of nazification. In the summer of 1940, the RvV encouraged the editor staffs of most notably the regional newspapers to co-operate in a positive way in the process of improving the relationship between the Netherlands and Germany. In order to realize this, the RvV sended free material to these newspapers. As a result of this encouragement, De Gelderlander (editor-in-chief: H.J. Vlooswijk), the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant (director/editor-in-chief: dr. A.C.B. Arts), and De Nieuwe Koerier (editor-in-chief: J. Thomassen) joined the RvV.
[14]
In the review of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in the edition of July 9, 1940 of the Heldersche Courant was quoted from the preface and the two chapters of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. This review was illustrated with a portrait of Nostradamus, which was depicted in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.
In the Nijmegen edition of De Gelderlander of July 13, 1940, the first part of the second chapter of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was published word-by-word; in the edition of July 15, 1940, the second part of this chapter was published word-by-word. In a slightly different lay-out, the first part of the second chapter of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was also published, word-by-word, in the edition of July 22, 1940 of the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant. In the edition of July 23, 1940 of this daily, the second part of this chapter was published word-by-word. This might mean that the RvV had send copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? to the editors of the Heldersche Courant, De Gelderlander and the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant, whether or not on request. In announcement #18 of the RvV, it was written that copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were send to the newspapers. In capitals, it was written that an extensive review would interest the readers and therefore was considered to be necessary. Announcement #18 did not carry a date. Announcement #23, dated on July 5, 1940, contained a reminder to this request. Editors who not yet had a copie of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, could order one at the editor, i.e. Ort. Also, the forthcoming publishing by Ort of the propaganda brochure Hongersnood in Engeland  (produced by the VGB) was announced. According to announcement #23, Ort had requested to review this brochure extensively, because of the actual circumstances, and to write, if possible, several articles about it. The RvV made no announcements about the other pro-German propaganda brochures by Meijer Schwencke / Ort which after the capitulation of the Netherlands were brought into circulation.

c. Identical reviews of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, published between June and August 1940
In order to keep the costs low, small newspapers not only bought pre-fab pages from press agencies, but also articles. Further, they frequently copied articles from other newspapers, sometimes while mentioning their source, sometimes not.[15] 
A number of reviews of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were published in several newspapers. Mostly, these reviews did not carry titles. On this website, these reviews are entitled by means of a part of their first line. In none of these reviews, the author is mentioned. It is also not mentioned if they originated from a press agency or if they were copied from another newspaper.
[16]
In all reviews, it was explained that the downfall of England was imminent. In a small number of reviews, it was described that not England, but Germany would be the most powerful nation in Europe. According to most reviews, however, the dominant role of England would be taken over by a French dictator. This prognosis was emprunted from the pages 32 - 34 of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, in which by means of quotations from De Fontbrune's Les Prophéties de Maistre Michel Nostradamus - Expliquées et commentées a war between England and France was described, which would end fatally for England in a battle in the Genovese Gulf. In these reviews, no attention was given to the outlook on page 35 of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? that the Holy Empire would come to Germany around the time that Great Britain would lose all her support in the world. Further, these reviews gave no attention to the remark on page 36 that France had surrendered itself to an almost incomprehensible dependency of British politics.
In a number of investigated newspapers, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was brought more than once to the attention of the readers. In July 1940, the Wieringer Courant -
nieuws- en advertentieblad voor Wieringen en omstreken, which was issued three times a week, discussed Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? six times.
It is quite possible that these reviews were written by the RvV. In the article Wonderlijke "voorlichting", published in the issue of July 20, 1940 of De Zeeuw - Dagblad voor de provincie Zeeland, it reads that the copy of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, furnished by the RvV (cf. announcement #18 of the RvV, described in the previous paragraph), was accompanied by six "review blueprints" and that some newspapers actually had published such a "review".

Een vraag die vrijwel iedere bewoner van dit aardsche tranendal zich in onze dagen stelt [...]
      
(tr.: A question which almost every inhabitant of this earthly misery aks himself in our days [...])
This article was published on June 14, 1940
in De Soester Courant and Nieuws en advertentieblad Frisia and on June 15, 1940 in the Texelsche Courant and De Drie Meren.
In Een vraag die vrijwel iedere bewoner van dit aardsche tranendal zich in onze dagen stelt [...], Nostradamus is presented as the exception to the rule that prophets are not able to answer questions about what will happen in the future. In the past, a great number of his predictions were fulfilled. For dr. De Fontbrune, this was reason to examine what, according to Nostradamus, would happen in the future. His findings are presented by means of a summary of the contents of the pages 25 ff of
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, including the title of the book by De Fontbrune which was published in 1939. The outlook according to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? that the future would be disastrous for England, is illustrated by means of the quatrains 02-83, 02-100, 03-57 and 08-37. The texts of these quatrains and the comments upon them are copied from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. The order in which they are discussed in Een vraag die vrijwel iedere bewoner van dit aardsche tranendal zich in onze dagen stelt [...], is identical with the order in which they are discussed in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. The interpretation of these quatrains was qualified as very clear and accurate. Quatrain 08-37 was the closing piece, raising the suggestion (which was also raised in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?) that a French government would seize power in England.
The article Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? ENGELANDS ONDERGANG VOORSPELD [...] (tr.: Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? ENGLAND'S DOWNFALL PREDICTED), published on July 9, 1940 in the Heldersche Courant and the Schager Courant, contains texts which can be traced back to Een vraag die vrijwel iedere bewoner van dit aardsche tranendal zich in onze dagen stelt [...].

De heer Nostrodamus, dokter en toekomstvoorspeller [...]
      
(tr.: Mr. Nostrodamus, physician and fortuneteller [...])
This article was published on July 6, 1940 in De Waalbode, on July 11, 1940 in the Wieringer Courant and on July 18, 1940 in Het Vaderland.
In De heer Nostrodamus, dokter en toekomstvoorspeller [...], Nostradamus (consequently printed Nostrodamus), is presented as a physician and fortuneteller, born in 1505 and deceased in 1566, who according to his own remarks extensively studied astrology and related sciences ans who in 1555, basing himself upon voices and visions, had published the first volume of a book, consisting of one thousand four-line verses which covered a time span up to 3797. Since these verses are not arranged in a chronological order and since they are written in a gloomy language, only those who are completely familiar with geography, history and old terminologies, can fathom their meaning. Dr. De Fontbrune made an extract of these verses and commented them. Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is the Dutch translation of his book.
The value of the predictions of Nostradamus can be seen in the fact that a great number of them was fulfilled in the years between 1555 and 1940. Remarkable is the fact that the war which had begun, was also predicted, as well as the rise of Hitler ("a Great") and an imminent debacle for England.
The contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is remarkable and deserves full attention of those who are interested in the present-day events.
On July 21, 1940, in the section Lezers vragen I(tr.: Readers ask) in the morning issue of Het Vaderland, the editors of this newspaper communicted, answering a question of mrs. J.N.K, that they did not know the price of the "Nostradamus book". This most likely refers to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and the review, published on July 19, 1940.

De heer Nostradamus was een merkwaardig man [...]
       (tr.: Mr. Nostradamus was a remarkable man [...])
This article was published on July 6, 1940 in the Texelsche Courant , on July 10, 1940 in the Provinciale Noordhollandsche Courant, on July 13, 1940 in the Wijksche Courant, on July 19, 1940 in Het Kanton Weert, on July 20, 1940 in Schilder's Nieuws- en advertentieblad and the Wieringer Courant and on July 22, 1940 in the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant. 
In De heer Nostradamus was een merkwaardig man [...], Nostradamus is presented as the son of a notary, who studied medicine and who in his latter days devoted himself to astrology and other secret sciences. He settled in Salon, the city who later gave him the name "Seer of Salon". Countless future events in Europe were revealed to him in visions. Soon after the publishing in 1555 of Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties de Maistre Nostradamus, his predictions drew attention because of the fulfillment of a prediction of the death of the French king Henry II.
The answer to the question "How will this war end?" would put an end to painful uncertainty and would enable to prepare oneself to the future. In Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, dr. De Fontbrune gives elucidations which are very striking. The value of the predictions of Nostradamus is shown by the fact that many of them are fulfilled, such as predictions about the fate of Napoleon, the invention of the airplane and the foundation of the League of Nations. According to Nostradamus, who also predicted the rise of Hitler, the future for England is unfavourable. The British Empire will no longer dominate the world. France on the contrary will recover quickly and faces a golden future.
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is recommended as an interested, carefully edited booklet which enables the interested reader to know in advance the predictions of Nostradamus and to verify their truth by comparing them with actual or future events.
In the version in the Provinciale Noordhollandsche Courant, it was mentioned that several brochures, published by Meijer Schwencke / Ort, could be bought at the office of this newspaper.
In the version in Het Kanton Weert, signed with the initial -F-, nothing was written about the part which France would play after the war. 
In the version, published in the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant, the text of De heer Nostradamus was een merkwaardig man [...] was followed by the text of the pages 27 - 30 of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, in which a.o. quatrain 03-57 was discussed. In the issue of July 23, 1940 of the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant, the remaining text of the second chapter of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was discussed, including the remark on page 36 that "from this all, wie see in what way the Centuries of Nostradamus contain a large number of prophecies which deal with our time". In an additional comment, it was stated that according to the Prophecies of Nostradamus the war would not result in a British or a German domination, but in a French domination. This remark was emprunted from the closing lines of De heer Nostradamus was een merkwaardig man. According to the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant, however, the circumstances in July 1940 did not point towards a domination by France. Perhaps, since Nostradamus was a Frenchman, this was a case of wishful thinking, reason to be skeptical towards prophecies, but nevertheless, the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? are remarkable and the carefully printed booklet invites the reader to study it.

Den naam van den Franschen ziener Maitre Nostradamus [...]
       (tr.: The name of the French seer Maitre Nostradamus [...])
This article was published on July 6, 1940 in the Zierikzeesche Nieuwsbode, on July 9, 1940 in the Nieuwe Tielsche Courant and the Wieringer Courant, on July 13, 1940 in De Drie Meren, on July 16, 1940 in Wormer en Jisper advertentieblad and on August 26, 1940 in Dagblad Nieuwe Hoornsche Courant.
In Den naam van den Franschen ziener Maitre Nostradamus [...], Nostradamus is presented as a reknown person, but little is known about his publications. The interest in his books increased because of the fact that according to commentators, many of his "prophecies", published in 1555, are fulfilled. It is therefore logical that many people want to know what he writes about the future.
In the first part of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, dr. De Fontbrune discusses predictions which are fulfilled. In the second part, he exposes a future which is not favourable for England, whereas France becomes most powerful.
One hundred copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? are numbered and printed on special paper. But the common copies are also carefully edited and contain illustrations, taken from the copy of the "prophecies" which was published in 1688. The low price makes this booklet a bargain.
Next to the closing lines of the version in Wormer en Jisper advertentieblad, it was mentioned that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was sold at Kuijper's Bookstore in Wormer, as well as the brochure Hongersnood in Engeland (tr.: Famine in England) by Viscount Lymington, its price 25 cents.

Niet ten onrechte staan velen sceptisch tegenover voorspellingen van astrologen [...]
       (tr.: Not wrongly, many are skeptical against predictions by astrologers [...]) 
This article was published on July 6, 1940 in the Wieringer Courant and the Delftsche Courant, on July 13, 1940 in De Holevoet, on July 16, 1940 in the Zaltbommelsche Courant, on JUly 19, 1940 in Nieuws- en advertentieblad Frisia, op July 27, 1940 in the Culemborgsche Courant and on August 1, 1940 in Dagblad Nieuwe Hoornsche Courant.
In Niet ten onrechte staan velen sceptisch tegenover voorspellingen van astrologen [...], Nostradamus is presented as a world-wide known futureteller, which means that his predictions differ from those of the many astrologers and prophets who in the course of the centuries went into oblivion.
Despite the fact that his predictions are gloomy, many times he hit the mark. As a result, his Centuries are now, in 1940, once again in focus. 
The first part of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? deals with the past. The second part deals with the question about how the war will end. The reviewer writes that it is not easy to distinguish explaining from wishful thinking and evades the answer to the question whether or not De Fontbrune is right. Nevertheless, he concluded that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is an interesting booklet which contains many remarkable things.

Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? ENGELANDS ONDERGANG VOORSPELD - Profetieën van den grooten Franschen waarzegger Michel Nostradamus
       (tr.: Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? ENGLAND'S DOWNFALL PREDICTED - Prophecies of the great French fortuneteller Michel Nostradamus)
This article was published on July 9, 1940 in the Heldersche Courant - Dagblad voor Den Helder en Hollands Noorderkwartier and in the Schager Courant, a co-edition of the
Heldersche Courant
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? ENGELANDS ONDERGANG VOORSPELD [...] contained fragments of the preface of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, in which the feelings of uncertainty and fear among the Dutch people were discussed and in which it was explained that Nostradamus provided an answer, and fragments of the two chapters of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? with remarkable fulfilled predictions among which a prediction about the outbreak in 1939 of the war, and speculations about what might happen in the near future, according to Nostradamus: a bloody sea battle in the Genuese Gulf, the downfall of England and the rise of a dictator in France. In a part which was also published in the discussion of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in the editions of June 14, 1940 of De Soester Courant and Frisia and the edition of June 15, 1940 of the Texelsche Courant, the readers were told that Nostradamus referred to Hitler as "a Great" and foresaw a debacle for England.
In both newspapers, this article was illustrated with a portrait of Nostradamus, painted by his son Cesar. This portrait was copied from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.

Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? Een vraag die velen bezighoudt [...]
       (tr.: Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? A question which occupies many [...])
This article was published on July 10, 1940 in De Graafschap Bode, on July 12, 1940 in the Biltsche Courant and the Zandvoortsche Courant and on July 16, 1940 in the Wieringer Courant.
In Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? Een vraag die velen bezighoudt [...], Nostradamus, a French physician who lived from 1506 to 1566, is presented as one of the seers who with infallible certainty could predict the future and who became well-known. Dr. de Fontbrune explained a number of his four-line verses and gave some comments. Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is an extract of his book.
According to De Fontbrune, a great number of the predictions of Nostradamus are fulfilled. Writing about the future, he presents the downfall of England. He does not write that much about Germany, but he writes a lot about France. It seems as if France will obtain a dominant position in the world which is the source of the conflict between Germany and Great Britain.
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? contains authentic illustrations and is edited carefully. It is a contribution to contemporary history and its low price encourages its buying.

Nostradamus, de bekende "ziener" [...]
       (tr.: Nostradamus, the well-known "seer"[...])

This article was published on July 12, 1940 in the Weekblad voor Zaltbommel and on July 18, 1940 in the Wieringer Courant.
In Nostradamus, de bekende "ziener" [...], Nostradamus is presented as a son, born in 1503,  of a French notary, who was educated by his grandfather in mathematics and astrology and who at the age of 26 graduated in medicine. Later, seated in Salon, he studied old books about magic and compiled his predictions in a gloomy language. Dr. de Fontbrune published this book and commented it. First, he shows which predictions were fulfilled in the past four hundred years; next, he scetches a future perspective in which England will fall and in which France will become a strong power. Time has to show whether or not this is an example of wishful thinking, but for whoever want to know how the war will end, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is worth reading. 

d. Unique discussions of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?
In the study upon which this article is based, articles were seen which, as far as can be traced, were published in only one newspaper. This might indicate that this article was written on the count of the newspaper and not acquired from elsewhere.

The Rotterdamsch Nieuwsblad, July 5, 1940
According to the review in the issue of July 5, 1940 of the Rotterdamsch Nieuwsblad, the interest of people in what in quiet days is called "dark scriptures" increases in times when the world is on fire. When there are disasters, when a war begins, the interest in the prophets of the new era increases, such as in the case of Nostradamus. According to the Rotterdamsch Nieuwsblad, the future of England is not bright at all if the predictions of Nostradamus and their explanations are correct.

The Agrarisch Nieuwsblad, July 8, 1940
In the issue of July 8, 1940 Agrarisch Nieuwsblad, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is discussed on page 4 in the section Over de grenzen (tr.: Across the borders). This review is entitled Profetieën van Nostradamus and is not published in the other daily's and weekly's which are discussed in this article. 
Profetieën van Nostradamus covers almost the complete first column of page 4. Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is characterized as a very remarkable, striking booklet. In order to illustrate this statement, a number of predictions are discussed which according to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were fulfilled in the past, such as the prediction which is linked to the beginning in 1914 of World War I, the sinking in 1916 of the British cruiser Hampshire and the prediction which is linked to the end of World War I. Next comes the comment in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? on quatrain 03-57. In Profetieën van Nostradamus is written that there will be a change in England in 1939, no matter how the war will end. The power of Hitler will increase (according to Profetieën van Nostradamus, his birth was predicted by Nostradamus). In France, a dictator will come. He will turn himself against England, which will be defeated by France in the Genuese Gulf and will disappear from the world theatre.
According to the author of Profetieën van Nostradamus, the signs of his lifetime point towards a growing contrast between France and England. As a result, he considers Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? to be actual and interesting.
Interesting is also the short article underneath Profetieën van Nostradamus, with the headline Oorlogsverklaring van Frankrijk aan Engeland? (tr.: French declaration of war to England?). According to this article, the Japanese government received unconfirmed messages which show that France has the intention to declare war to England and that French authorities in Haiphong (in the former French Indo-China) had chained British ships. 

De Vijf Rivieren, July 9 and 16, 1940
Between the end of June and the end of December 1940, an article was published on page 5 of every Tuesday-edition of De Vijf Rivieren, entitled Wat de sterren u zeggen (tr.: What the stars are telling you). Most of these articles had the size of half a column. The first half of these articles contained information about astrological topics such as the history of astrology, the Zodiac and the astrological meaning of the Sun. The second half of these articles contained predictions for the Zodiacal sign in which the Sun was moving at the time of publishing. The war was not discussed in these articles.
In the first half of Wat de sterren u zeggen in the edition of July 9, 1940, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was discussed. According to the article, it was not quite a coincidence that in that period, a boekske (dialect for "booklet") was published by W.J. Ort in The Hague with predictions of Nostradamus, explained by dr. De Fontbrune, which gave the reader an impression about the course of present-day events, as saw by Nostradamus-adepts. Nostradamus was described as a very peculiar man, who lived a silent life, practiced astrology very seriously and to whom Europe's future was unveiled by means of occultism. All who would read Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? without prejudice, would have to admit that a great number of his predictions were fulfilled quite accurately.
In the edition of July 16, 1940, the first half of Wat de sterren u zeggen contained a description of the fortune of astrology in the course of the centuries. It was discussed for example that the medieval Church Fathers turned against astrology. Nostradamus was mentioned as one of the famous astrologers, living in that era, and there was a reference to the article, published on July 9, 1940, in which was quoted from his work.
None of these articles contain lines, either positive of negative, about the fact that in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? England's fall and Germany's victory was described.

De Gorcumer, July 12, 1940
On page 5 of the issue of July 12, 1940 of De Gorcumer, an article was published, entitled Voorspellingen (tr.: Predictions). In this article, which was spread over three columns, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was discussed extensively. According to the article, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, published by W.J. Ort, contained a number of the predictions of Nostradamus, together with comments by the French Nostradamus-expert De Fontbrune. It was not the purpose of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? to demonstrate which of Nostradamus' predictions were fulfilled a long time ago, but to inform the readers of this book about what Nostradamus expected for the future. By means of quotes from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, the readers of De Gorcumer got explained. London would suffer heavily because of air raids and England would be defeated and would suffer heavy losses, in order to disappear from the world's theatre, to give way to Germany, since Nostradamus predicted that the Holy Empire would come to Germany, Nostradamus, who had predicted about Hitler that he was "a Great", born from the people who came too late.

De Residentiebode en het Nederlandsch Dagblad, July 23, 1940
The issues of July 23, 1940 of De Residentiebode and the Nederlandsch Dagblad, its copy, contain an extensive article, entitled Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot (tr.: Tragic blindness - Nostradamus as ally). This article speculated about a confrontation between England and Germany, because of a speech of Lord Halifax, the secretary of Foreign Affairs, who, according to Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot had stated that England preferred to live her own life, to serve her own God, had not wanted this war and would fight no longer as necessary. In both daily's, these statements were characterized as a result of "tragic blindness", which would bring terrible consequences for the British people. This perspective was emphasized by the discussion of a number of passages in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. In case of a final battle, it was indicated in the Prophecies of Nostradamus that a superpower would come to an end, and this superpower would not be Germany. A number of commentators had written that in the sixteenth century, Nostradamus had predicted the downfall of England. In Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot, this was presented with some caution, because comments were at stake and the predictions of the French prophet are rather gloomy. Nevertheless, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was presented in Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot as a beautiful printed study of the Nostradamus-scholar dr. De Fontbrune, with a selection of the Prophecies, which were explained in a plausible way. Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot does not evaluate the Prophecies of Nostradamus or the comments upon them, and advice to read them without belief or rejection. It is better for the readers of Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot to base themselves upon reality than upon predictions which can be interpreted in two ways. However, solving riddels in these predictions is a nice way of spending time, not in the least because the perspective which emerges from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? naar voren komt, fits to the reality as described in Tragische verblinding - Nostradamus als bondgenoot: a final battle between England and Germany, with Nostradamus as a German ally. 

The Haagsche Courant, July 24, 1940
The section Van de boekenplank (tr.: From the bookshelf) on page 7 of the issue of July 24, 1940 contained a review of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. According to this review, not only history, but also seers could answer the question about how the war would end. One of the great seers was the physician Nostradamus, son of a notary, who was famous for his courage in fighting the plague and who in his later life devoted himself to astrology. His Centuries were very remarkable. The predictions in the Centuries could only be understood by adepts and scholars, because of their gloomy language, and were often discussed in profound studies. In this review, the comments in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? upon the predictions are attributed to dr. De Fontbrune, who first discusses a series of predictions which in the course of the four preceeding centuries were fulfilled, such as the rise of Hitler, and next predictions which point towards the end of the British Empire and the increasing power of France. In the closing line, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is recommended as an interesting, nice printed, illustrated booklet.

De Koerier - Deventer Dagblad, August 3, 1940
The section Leestafel on page 2 of the edition of August 3, 1940, contained a review of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. Briefly, the readers were informed about the gloomy nature of the Centuries, the fact that their reputation originated from 1559 and the skills of Dr. de Fontbrune, who had commented them. The reviewer stated that the fact that in the past, a number of the predictions of Nostradamus were fulfilled (such as predictions about Napoleon, the invention of the airplane and the submarine and the rise and fortune of the League of Nations), showed the ability of Nostradamus as a seer. For "the present", he had predicted the rise of Hitler, the relations between Germany, Italy and the Soviet-Union and the war which had begun in 1939. According to the reviewer, Nostradamus had written that the course of the war would be disastrous for England. 
With the closing line that it would be interesting to read these predictions in order to see what would become true in the coming time, since according to the comments, many of Nostradamus' predictions already were fulfilled, the reviewer provoked the curiosity of his readers or their anxiety.

The Limburger Koerier, August 12, 1940
The lower half of page 7 of the issue of August 12, 1940 contains an extensive review of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. The review began with the remark that when the war began, the Limburger Koerier, for reasons of curiosity, published predictions of a.o. Victor van Leliëndal, Catharina of Siëna en the pastor of Ars. According to the author of the review, the predictions in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? are that striking, that they deserve an extensive discussion. Next comes an extensive summary of the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, which frequently contains word-by-word fragments. The prediction of the invasion in Poland is discussed in depth. The imminent downfall of England and France is described as well as the cooperation between Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin. 
The review closes with the remark that the One, who knows everything, also what will come, will give great and unusual gifts to some men, but rules the fate of the world. Therefore, the reader is advised to trust, by prayer, in His fatherly wisdom and omnipotence. 

The Leeuwarder Courant, August 26, 1940
The section Boekentafel (tr.: book desk) in the edition of August 26, 1940 of the Leeuwarder Courant contained a short description of the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. About Nostradamus was told that in 1555, he published prophecies which covered a time span until 3797. The contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were described as what Nostradamus predicted about "the time in which we live", in other words: 1940, and a number of his predictions which in the four hundred years between 1555, the year of publishing, and "our time" (i.e. 1940) were fulfilled already.
The description in the Leeuwarder Courant corresponds with the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?

Het Volk, November 16, 1940
Page 2 of the appendix Morgenrood of the issue of November 16, 1940 of Het Volk, an appendix which, according to the headlines, was added each Saturday to all the daily's of NV De Arbeiderspers, contains an article, entitled Iets over waarzegsters en helderzienden - Kan het geheim van de toekomst worden doorgrond? (tr.: Something about soothsayers and seers - Is it possible to unveil the secrets of the future?). The reader is kept uncertain. Normally, soothsayers receive their clients in dark rooms. The secret knowledge they have, is nothing more of less than knowledge about human nature. Everyday circumstances which occur in the life of all men and women, and which they describe in the light of the future, are connected by their clients to their individual life and circumstances. However, there is the chance of clairvoyance. Science can not debunk this. In the past, science made big progresses, but no explanation has been found for the production of gold or the secrets of life. In the course of the centuries, there were great seers who made predictions which were fulfilled. Nostradamus was not a seer in the usual sense of the word. He was a great scholar, was attracted by astronomy and developed his gift of prophecy by his own powerfull will. He predicted the rise of Napoleon, Hitler and Mussolini and the outbreak of the war. The year of outbreak which he mentioned, 1939, was correct.
The article closed with the line: "Wat to say about this? Well, let the reader judge by himself."
Nowhere in the article, the title Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was mentioned of the name of W.J. Ort as its publisher. The listed predictions of Nostradamus which were supposed to be fulfilled, can be traced back to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, including the year 1939 as the year in which the war began, which leads to the conclusion that these predictions were copied from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.

e. Advertisements and announcements
A number of newspapers either contained advertisements regarding Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? or announcements about its publishing. In the study upon which this article is based, the following advertisements and announcements were observed:

  • De Zandvoorter, July 24 and 26,1940: advertisement of Van Petegem's bookstore, Zandvoort; 

  • Leeuwarder Courant, September 7, October 2 and November 23, 1940: advertisement of Nieuwenhuis bookstore,  Sacramentstraat, Leeuwarden;

  • Leeuwarder Nieuwsblad, September 11 and November 24, 1940: advertisement of Nieuwenhuis bookstore, Sacramentstraat, Leeuwarden;

  • Limburger Koerier, July 13, 1940, section Nieuwe uitgaven: announcement that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? has been published;

  • Texelsche Courant, July 13, 1940: advertisement by Parkstad bookstore, Den Burg;

  • Wieringer Courant, July 11, 1940: the remark that dr. De Fontbrune was one of those who studied and commented the Centuries and that his study is translated into Dutch;

  • Wormer en Jisper advertentieblad, August 15, 1940: discussion of the brochures Hongersnood in Engeland en Oorlog in het Noorden, published by Ort. In the closing lines, it was noted that these brochures were sold at Kuijper's bookstore in Wormer, which also had Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, De waarheid marcheert, Kan Engeland den oorlog winnen?, S.O.S. Europa and Grote verkondigers van het voortbestaan in stock, all of them published by Ort.

Het Nationale Dagblad, a daily newspaper, published by the NSB, the Dutch national-socialist movement, and Volk en Vaderland, a newspaper, published by the NSB, wrote nothing about Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.

 

The purpose of the positive articles about the pro-German propaganda brochures of Meijer Schwencke / Ort
Before the German invasion in the Netherlands on May 10, 1940, four of the twelve pro-German propaganda brochures by Meijer Schwencke / Ort were published: De waarheid marcheert..., Kan Engeland den oorlog winnen?, the first and second edition of Tsjecho-Slowakije - slachtoffer der Westersche mogendheden and the first edition of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. Only in a couple of daily's and newspapers in which after the capitulation of the Netherlands on May 15, 1940, articles were published about Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and the other brochures of Meijer Schwencke / Ort, articles were published before the German invasion in May 1940 about De waarheid marcheert... and Tsjecho-Slowakije - slachtoffer der Westersche mogendheden. In those articles, which were written independent of each other, these brochures, which were qualified as German (!) propaganda brochures, were heavily criticized. In this period, no articles were written about Kan Engeland den oorlog winnen? and Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.
From the capitulation of the Netherlands on May 15, 1940 until February 1941, almost all daily's and newspapers, discussed in the previous paragraph, contained positive reviews of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and the other pro-German propaganda brochures of Meijer Schwencke / Ort which were published after the capitulation, among which reprints of De waarheid marcheert... and Tsjecho-Slowakije - slachtoffer der Westersche mogendheden. Often, these reviews were identical with each other. This leads to a number of questions, such as who wrote them, who ordered to write them, how they found their way to the daily's and the newspapers and what was the nature of their purpose..
The announcements #18 and #23 of the RvV show that the RvV wanted that the pro-German propaganda message of these brochures would be advocated in daily's and newspapers. According to announcement #18, copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was send to the newspapers and there was an urgent request to discuss this brochure. In announcement #23, dated in July 5, 1940, in the name of Ort was urged to discuss Hongersnood in Engeland; this announcement also contained a reminder of the request to discuss Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. The article about Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in the edition of July 9, 1940 of the Heldersche Courant contains many quotations from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. In the editions of July 13 and 15, 1940 of the Nijmegen edition of De Gelderlander, the second chapter of this brochure was almost completely published. It is quite plausible that the editors of the Heldersche Courant and De Gelderlander were on the mailing list of newspapers to which the RvV sended a copy of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. Most likely, the announcements #18 and #23 came from Meijer Schwencke. In his capacity of owner/director of the VGB, he was involved in the production of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and Hongersnood in Engeland and will have known the data on which they were or would be published. The question is if he brought these brochures to the attention of newspapers due to his own initiative or if he was ordered to do so by for example the Ausland section of the Ministry of Propaganda which on May 15, 1940, the day of the capitulation of the Netherlands, ordered to print 3.000 extra copies of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.
About the pre-fab page with the sections De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week, Deze week in Nederland and De wereld in kaart, the questions rise which press agency produced this page and if the article about Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? which was published mid-June 1940 in De Soester Courant, Frisia and the Texelsche Courant on this page was written by a journalist of this press agency or if this article came from a source outside this agency.
In his professional life, Meijer Schwencke was active in many ways, not seldom behind the scenes. He wanted to make career, to handle big business and to get a lot of influence. In order to realize this, he founded enterprises and initiated co-operations and fusions. His political ideas, which in the course of World War II underwent changes, seems to be determined by the amount in which he could realize his commercial aims or the amount in which he felt himself threatened in his commercial interests. He was able to do business with friends as well as with enemies and could play people off against each other.[17] 

In the thirties, the VPB, owned by Meijer Schwencke, produced bulletins such as Dagelijksche Actuele Dienst, Opbouw and Nieuw Europa. These bulletins contained news and background articles. It was possible for newspapers to subscribe to these bulletins. Further, the VPB produced articles about foreign countries, culture, fashion, politics and sport. Especially the smaller daily's, newspapers and magazines who had no editors in these fields, bought these articles.[18] The question is if the VPB also produced the pre-fab page with the sections De internationale toestand in de afgeloopen week, Deze week in Nederland en De wereld in kaart and if the VPB, after the capitulation of the Netherlands, delivered the positive reviews of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and the other pro-German propaganda brochures of Meijer Schwencke / Ort to daily's and newspapers. It seems to be possible, since Meijer Schwencke worked in the branch of regional daily's and newspapers. In 1936, behind the scenes, he stimulated the foundation of the PP (Provinciale Pers), a union of newspaper publishers. This union had to compete with the existing unions of newspaper publishers. The members of the PP got articles from the VPB, which by doing so regained a part of the news spreading which she in the previous years had lost to the ANP (Algemeen Nederlandsch Persbureau), the GPD (Groote Provinciale Dagbladen) en de RP (Regionale Pers). With the foundation in June 1940 of ther RvV, Meijer Schwencke wanted to prevent that the same things would happen to the Dutch regional press i.c. the VPB as to the German regional press after Hitler's seize of power in 1933, since from that time, the German regional press was put aside by the Ministry of Propaganda and the DNB (Deutsche Nachrichtenbüro). The foundation in July 1940 of the PPP (Vakgroep Provinciale en Periodieke Pers), a fusion between the PP and the NPP  (Nederlandsche Periodieke Pers), was another initiative of Meijer Schwencke, who wanted to prevent that the PP would be dominated by the NPP, an organization with which the PP closely co-operated since 1937. By the end of August 1940, 272 publishers had joined the PPP, representing 201 newspapers, 237 professional papers and 250 magazines.[19] No doubt that the PPP sended articles to their members. Perhaps the positive reviews of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and the other pro-German propaganda brochures of Meijer Schwencke / Ort were among these articles.
In the post-war administration of justice, Meijer Schwencke defended himself by stating that he took care of undermining the translation and spread of the pro-German propaganda brochures, with the result that their propagandistic impact was minimalized.[20] A comparison between Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and Was bringt das Jahr 1940? and the articles about these brochures which were published in a number of daily's and newspapers, show the contrary. Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? is a word-by-word translation of Was bringt das Jahr 1940?. In not even the slightest way, the translators neutralized the propaganda message. Moreover, by the insertion of the names Pasteur and De Fontbrune and the insertion of the suggestion that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was based upon French publications, they created a threefold trace to France as the original country of issue. With the use of marketing strategies such as describing the care with which these brochures were produced and their importance for those who were interested in contemporary history and while trigging the intellect by referring to the ability of readers to read this publications with a critical sense, the propaganda message of these brochures was broadly exposed in these articles and the readers were confronted with it, without wanting so. Most of these brochures had a low circulation number (around 5.000 copies), which heavily limits their reach. By discussing their contents in daily's and newspapers, the reach increased substantially. In time, however, the reach of these articles was limited. Unlike a brochure, a daily or newspaper is not kept long. But a demoralizing rumour, resulting of these articles, would find its way.
The present information does not indicate that after May 15, 1940, the German authorities ordered that the contents of the pro-German propaganda brochures of Meijer Schwencke / Ort should be published by means of articles in regional newspapers. The fact that after May 15, 1940, the complete series of these brochures were discussed in regional newspapers, might have been the result of the wish of Meijer Schwencke to sell his stock. Whether or not financial motives were at stake, the propaganda message of these brochures was presented in daily's and newspapers, even in those newspapers in which some of these brochures were heavily criticized before the German invasion on May 10, 1940. 

 

Counter-weight
This paragraph contains reviews of publications in which the author openly or silently criticized rumours about the predictions of Nostradamus or Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.

De Zeeuw, July 6 and July 20, 1940
The daily De Zeeuw - Dagblad voor de Provincie Zeeland was an independent daily of a protestant signature. Before May 1940, the esteemed number of subscribers was 3.800; by the end of 1940, the esteemed number of subscribers was 3.854.
Page 2 of the issue of July 6, 1940 of the daily De Zeeuw - Dagblad voor de Provincie Zeeland contains the article Aan het zoeklicht (tr.: near the searchlight). The author, who uses the author's pseudonym Opmerker (tr.: observer) understands that many people worry about how the war will end and that in some circles, people turn themselves to soothsayers in their search for an answer. Opmerker was astonished to see that in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, the course and end of the war was described in full certainty. He regrets that the readers of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? by means of the biblical phrase "whoever has ears to listen..." are summoned to listen to the soothsayings of Nostradamus, who was gifted with prophecy. He exhort his readers with the remark: Thou shall not turn thyselves to the soothsayers, nor seek them. I am the Lord your God".

Page 2 of the issue of July 20, 1940 of the daily De Zeeuw - Dagblad voor de Provincie Zeeland contains the article Wonderlijke "voorlichting" (tr."peculiar enlightenment"). The readers of this article are informed about the fact that the Raad van Voorlichting der Nederlandsche Pers urged the editors of various newspapers to discuss Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? extensively. In this brochure, the course and end of the war was presented by means of a prediction about seven changes in England. The editor of De Zeeuw did not subscribe the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. On the contrary, by means the publication of almost all of the contents of Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no. 7, written by prof. dr. Klaas Schilder and published in the issue of July 19, 1940 of the weekly De Reformatie, Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was blown into smithereens.

Het Volk, July 14, 1941
Page 7 of the issue of July 14, 1941 of Het Volk contains the article "Voorspellingen" - Gezond verstand vóór redeloze lichtgelovigheid tr.: Predictions - common sense preferred to irrational gullibility) in which the author turns himself agains predictions in general and most notably war predictions, especially when they are the result of psychological warfare. These predictions are criticized by quotations from an article, written by the Dutch historian G. Gorris S.J., which was published in the Roman-Catholic Studiën magazine (according to the issue of July 233, 1941 of the Limburgsch Dagblad, that article was entitled Tijd van oorlog - Tijd van voorspellingen (tr.: Time of war - time of predictions) and was part of the section Dingen van de dag [tr.: everyday things]). The Prophecies of Nostradamus were qualified as mysterious utterings, which a year ago (1940, TvB) were in focus. If, Gorris wrote, one knows that even the greatest scholars have trouble to translate the gloomy predictions from old-French and to comment them, it is better for the common man to keep himself at a distance. 
On this website, it is concluded that in 1941, Gorris turned himself against the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, published in 1940.
As for Studien, it must be noted that in the summer of 1941, further issue was prohibited by the German authorities.

De Maasbode, July 19, 1940
The daily De Maasbode was an independent newspaper of Roman-Catholic nature. In 1940, it was the most important Roman-Catholic newspaper in the Netherlands. De Maasbode was issued in the morning and in the evening. Before May 1940, the esteemed number of subscribers was 51.631; by the end of 1940, the esteemed number of subscribers was 37.260. On February 4, 1941, De Maasbode was prohibited.
Page 5 in the evening issue of July 19, 1940 of De Maasbode contained the article De profeet van Salon - Michel Nostradamus voorspellingen - Engelands ondergang in de sterren geschreven? (tr.: The prophet of Salon - Michel Nostradamus predictions - England's downfall written in the stars?). In this article, Nostradamus, those who were interested in him and the brochure Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? were critically discussed.
The article opens with the remark that in the same frequency of outbreak of wars, predictions about the way they end are brought into circulation. The authors know very well that, especially in times of trouble, a great part of the people are gullible enough to believe these predictions. Man is attracted by mystery, especially in the case of mysterious oracles of a sacred, astral nature. In 1940, regarding war predictions, the same things happened as in 1914/'18.
The author of De profeet van Salon [...] has compared the contents of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? with the contents of the 1668-Amsterdam-edition of the Centuries. A copy of that edition was preserved in the municipal library of Rotterdam which, the author subtly noted, remained untouched in the Rotterdam disaster (i.e. the German bombardment of Rotterdam on May 14, 1940). From the Brief Discours, he copied a couple of facts of the life of Nostradamus. With fragments of the Epistle to Henry II, he shows that the Centuries were deliberately written in a gloomy language.
Regarding the pages in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? in which the downfall of England was described, the author of De profeet van Salon [...] states that, since in 1806 a book was published, entitled Napoleon ... prédit par Nostradamus, it was not strange that in 1940 a book was published, in which was stated that in the late Middle Ages Nostradamus foresaw the rise of Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin. By means of a combination of quatrains (the quatrains 03-57 and 10-100) is was possible to link a remarkable suggestive series of predictions to each other, so that the impression would raise that Nostradamus was an eye-witness to the events of 1940. However, the author closes, the predictions of Nostradamus are so gloomy that one can derive from them whatever one wants and that one can ignore whatever one wants to ignore. Man is inclined to believe what he wants to believe.

De Reformatie, July 19, 1940
The weekly De Reformatie - weekblad tot ontwikkeling van het gereformeerde leven was founded in 1920. Until the mid-eighties, it was issued once a week (at present, it is issued twice a week). From 1935 to 1952, prof. dr. Klaas Schilder, professor theology at the Theologische Hogeschool in Kampen, NL, was editor-in-chief.
Schilder strongly opposed national-socialism, which he qualified as gentile and anti-Christian. In 1936, due to his influence, the genral assembly of the Dutch Reformed Churches banned the NSB, the Dutch national-socialist movement. In August 1940, the Germans indefinitely prohibited further issuing of De Reformatie. Schilder was arrested. In December 1940, he was released, but he was no longer allowed to write or publish. From July 1942 to July 1944, he was in hiding.
In the issue of July 19, 1940, using the author's pseudonym "Adolphus Venator", Schilder's article Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no 7 (tr.: to a younger comtemporary, volume 7) was published. With this article, he lend an ear to the two announcements of the RvV to discuss Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?; in the opening lines of his article, he mentioned these aanouncements. A couple of times, Schilder quoted from Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, which implies that he owned a copy of this brochure. Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no 7 does not show if it was the RvV who sent a copy of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? to De Reformatie, as announcement #18 about this brochure suggests, or if De Reformatie asked for a copy, as announcement #23 suggests.
In Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no 7, Schilder, from an evangelical point of view, not only criticized Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? but also the RvV, mentioning Tobie Goedewaagen, her president, and mr. Meinoud Marinus Rost van Tonningen, one of its members, by name. Schilder further asked dr. Anton Adriaan Mussert, leader van de NSB, if he had enough time to become a true Nostradamus-expert. In the days prior to July 19, 1940, Mussert had said lots of things about the Jews. Schilder told his readers that those who in his days scolded the Jews, were unaware of the fact that Nostradamus was from Jewish origin, something which according to Schilder every Nostradamus-expert knew, and like that made a Jew to function as a herald of the German victory and made astrology to function as a means of religious preaching. In Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no 7, he criticized the presentation of Nostradamus in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? as a devoted Christian. From the Encyclopédie moderne ou dictionnaire abrégé des hommes et des choses (Brussels, 1830, vol. XVII, p.117), he quoted that in the eyes of his comtemporaries, Nostradamus was an imposter and that publications dealing with Nostradamus only enforced superstition, without any further practical utility.
In Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no 7, Schilder discussed the comment in Hoe za upon quatrain 03-57. In this comment, it was suggested that in the period 1649-1939, there would be no fundamental changes in France, in contrast with England. According to Schilder, this suggestion ignored the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte. This was reason for him to begin Aan een jongeren tijdgenoot, no 7 with the announcement that quite quickly, the Netherlands would face a new, adjusted Study Book of History, approved by Goedewaagen en Van Tonningen. 
Schilder closed his article with the remark that in the year in which Nostradamus died, the Dutch Calvinists started to practice their Confessional Words. In article 5 of the Dutch Confession, it was written that only the books of the Old and New Testament would be accepted as holy and canonical and without any doubt the Christians would believe its contents, since they experienced by themselves that all things which were predicted in the Old and New Testament, truly occurred. According to Schilder, the Dutch Calvinists were strictly obedient to their faith and as a result never spared tyranny and never restrained Jews who turned themselves from the writings of Nostradamus to the Holy Scriptures, from being baptized. He therefore expressed the wish that his younger contemporary would consider all this.

Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden, July 24, 1940
In 1917, Tilburg textile manufacturers founded the daily Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden, an independent daily of a Roman-Catholic nature. This daily had to be the counterweight of the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant, which was the mouthpiece of the labour unions and advocated social changes, which were not approved by the Tilburg clergy. Before May 1940, the estimated number of subscribers was 9.000; by the end of 1940, the estimated number of subscribers was 8.837. On October 1, 1941, Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden was forbidden and further publication was ceased until after the war. In 1992 Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden was immerset in the Brabants Dagblad.
The frontpage of the issue of July 24, 1940 of Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden contains an article, entitled De toekomst voorspeld uit koffiedik (tr.: The future predicted out of tea leaves), in which, because of predictions, dealing with the course of the war, war predictions in general were discussed, most notably the predictions of Nostradamus, i.e. the brochure Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? and the attitude of the press, especially the Roman-Catholic press, towards this brochure.
According to the author of De toekomst voorspeld uit koffiedik, who openly exposed his Roman-Catholic conviction, God gave to some great men, prophets and saints the gift of prophecy. Attempts to predict the future by means of cards and figures were dangerous and objectionable. According to the author, nobody should occupy himself with these matters, neither to show that Germany would lose the war, neither to show that Germany would win the war.
According to the author, the Prophecies of Nostradamus could be explained in many ways, due to the lack of fulfilment years. Therefore, they could be linked to countless events. The message in a booklet which was published some weeks before the writing of De toekomst voorspeld uit koffiedik (although the author does not mention its title, it is clear that he refers to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?), that England was about to lose the war, was as unreliable as the rumour in the past that near Poitiers, the German troops would be defeated, of that 1940 would turn out fatal for Mussolini. With a painful astonishment, the author noticed that a number of newspapers, among them Roman-Catholic newspapers, recommended this brochure, told many good things about it and even printed the half of its contents. With this criticism, the author turned himself against the Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant. In the issues of July 22 and 23, 1940 of this daily, the text of the pages 27 - 36 of Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was printed word-by-word, despite the fact that in the eighteenth century, as the author reminded, the Roman-Catholic Church forbade Les vrayes Centuries et Propheties by Michel Nostradamus and included its title in the Papal Index. 
According to the author of De toekomst voorspeld uit koffiedik, Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden advocated a new Europe, but this advocation was the result of expectations, based upon superstition. God rules the world and despite the fact that the world is full of arguing people, He leads world history to the aim He has in mind. Card readers, star gazers and tee leaves readers are not able to fathom His plan.
Right of De toekomst voorspeld uit koffiedik was an article, in which Het Nieuwsblad van het Zuiden supported the triumvirate of the Nederlandsche Unie and a flyer was depicted, in which this Union called upon the Dutch people to accept the changed political circumstances and to work for the future of the Netherlands by means of national concord and solidarity, in the Dutch tradition of mental and intellectual freedom and tolerance.

De Nieuwe Koerier, August 5, 1940
De Nieuwe Koerier - Maas en Roerbode, printed in Roermond, was a daily with a Roman-Catholic character, edited by the Provinciaal Limburgsch Dagblad. Before May 1940, the estimated number of subscribers was 11.920. By the end of 1940, the estimated number of subscribers was 12.800.
Page 5 of the edition of August 5, 1940 of De Nieuwe Koerier contained the article Men gelooft... (tr.: It is believed...), written by Henri de Greeve pr. This article was one of the articles in De Greeve's series Modern Panopticum, dating from 1939-1940, which probably also was published in other newspapers
De Greeve opened Men gelooft... with a list of all kinds of ecclesiastical publications, directed against philosophies and currents which in the course of the centuries turned themselves against religion and turned countless ordinary citizens and workers into non-believers. The time in which Men gelooft... was written, clearly showed, according to De Greeve, that the efforts of the Church to bring people back to religion, had been in vain. He concluded that believing was easy, that people in his lifetime believed in whatever thing and were willing to believe the most incredible things. From Men gelooft... can be derived that the rumour had been spread that the events in 1940 already were predicted in the 1937-edition of the Enkhuizer Almanak. De Greeve scrutinized this almanac and concluded that it contained no such predictions. But people nevertheless believed this rumour.
De Greeve wondered about what he called the tropical intensity of the beliefs of often the most hard non-believers. People believed in predictions which were contradictory to each other or excluded each other. Every day, he was interviewed about phenomena like Nostradamus, the predictions of the Lüneburg fields or the Odilia-source. He wondered why it was so difficult to believe in a catholic catechism, the words of Christ and the wisdom of the Gospel. Perhaps, he closed Men gelooft..., because they contain the truth.
De Greeve did not mention Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?, but Men gelooft... illustrates that a certain value was given to the predictions of Nostradamus.[21]

 

1941-Vreede-translation

The 1941-Vreede-translation
In the beginning of 1941, NV Servire publishers in The Hague (NL) published the book De Profetieën van Nostradamus - Nederlandsche vertaling, voorafgegaan door een levensschets en een inleiding, en van aantekeningen voorzien door Mr. Dr. W.L. Vreede. This book, which is discussed elsewhere on this website, contained a translation of the ten centuries in the 1938-Piobb-copy of the 1668-Asmterdam-edition, completed with a translation of the German translation by dr. Christian Wöllner of the Preface to Cesar and the Epistle to Henry II in Das Mysterium des Nostradamus (Leipzig, 1926). Further, this book contained a biography of Nostradamus and an introduction to the Centuries.[22]
The 1941-Vreede-translation vertaling-Vreede-1941 is a non-political book in the sense of not containing links between predictions in the Centuries and what happened in Europe from the beginning of the 20th century up to 1940. The introduction chapter, however, contains remarks in which Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was criticized between the lines. The name Mr. Dr. W.L. Vreede was the translator's pseudonym of the French teacher mr. dr. Hendrik Houwens Post (Surakarta, September18, 1904 - Utrecht, September 1, 1986).

 

The discussed quatrains in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? versus Was bringt das Jahr 1940?
All quatrains which are discussed in Was bringt das Jahr 1940? are also discussed in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?. The comments in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? are identical with the comments in Was bringt das Jahr 1940?. Compared with Was bringt das Jahr 1940?, no quatrains are added to Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?.

The discussed quatrains in Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?

Voorwoord bij het verschijnen van een actueele verklaring der voorspellingen van den grooten Franschen Ziener Michel Nostradamus
no quatrains discussed
Verleden, heden en toekomst op wonderbaarlijke wijze voorspeld door den Franschman Michel Nostradamus in zijn "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties"
01-35
01-36
01-01
01-02
09-18
09-34
05-57
03-35
01-60
07-13
04-82
01-43

10-24
06-22
05-28
03-13
02-68
08-60
01-47
06-20
decease Henry II
end of the House of Valois
method Nostradamus
method Nostradamus
beheading Montmorency
siege of the Tuileries, August 10, 1792
De Montgolfier; Napoleon Bonaparte vs. Pius VI
birth Napoleon on Corsica
birth Napoleon on Corsica
Napoleon: the "shaven head"; duration Napoleonic Empire (erroneously numbered as VIII-13)
Moscow destroyed by Napoleon
the erection of the Column of Vendome
Napoleon's return from Elba; defeat
decease Napoleon III in London
fatal attempt on king Umberto
World War I: submarines
World War I: England free of destructions
World War I: end
League of Nations
short existence League of Nations; rise of Mussolini (erroneously numbered as V-20)
Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? Een antwoord op de vele belangrijke vraagstukken, die ons bezighouden gegeven door "Les vrayes Centuries et Prophéties de maistre Michel Nostradamus"
10-100
03-57
02-100
02-83
08-37
02-78
03-32
03-71
08-97
02-85
03-58
10-31
01-99
from 1603, England is supreme for more than 300 years
1939: crises in England and Poland
positions neutral countries
blockade of the trade with England, air raids
capitulation of London, new government in France
fall of England
battle in the Genovese Gulf
England will fall
battle in the Genovese Gulf
England threatened by France
birth and rise of Hitler
the Holy Empire comes to Germany
the Molotov - Von Ribbentrop pact
Aanhangsel - verklaringen
no quatrains discussed

 

De Meern, the Netherlands, March 4, 2007
T.W.M. van Berkel
updated on July 29, 2013

 

Notes
The titles, places and year of issue of the mentioned authors are listed in the bibliography.

  1. Richter, p.72. [text

  2. Van Berkel: Was bringt das Jahr 1940?. [text]

  3. Maichle: Die Nostradamus-Propaganda der Nazis, 1939-1942. [text]

  4. Maichle: Die Nostradamus-Propaganda der Nazis, 1939-1942; Boelcke-1966, p.304 and Boelcke-1989 (1967), p.28. The question is if after August 1940, these brochures were still in print. [text]

  5. Nationaal Archief, The Hague, NL, file 37401-I. This might explain why Ort in the post-war administration of justice stated that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? was produced and spread in July 1940 and why dr. W.H.C. Tenhaeff in his book Oorlogsvoorspellingen (The Hague, 1948, p.214) stated that Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen? dated from after the capitulation of the Netherlands in May 1940. [text]

  6. "Pasteur", p.46. [text]

  7. The company data are mentioned on www.bibliopolis.nl; the biographical data are mentioned on http://www.genealogieonline.nl/familieboek-ort. The portrait of Willem Johan Ort is a cut-out of a photograph, originally published on http://www.genealogieonline.nl/familieboek-ort and is published by courtesy of R.G. Ort, author and webmaster. [text]

  8. Groeneveld, p.79 and 85; Rapport inzake Jan Campert, p.24-27 (http://www.denhaag.nl/pics/hga/pdf/251768_BW_inter.pdf).
    Thirteen titles of publications, published in 1939/'41 by the VGB / W.J. Ort, could be traced:
    * De ondergang van een imperium - over de "teloorgang" van het Engelse wereldrijk (R.S. Briffault, 1940)
    * De waarheid marcheert... (dr. W.R.V. Picht, 1939 [1st edition] and 1940 [2nd and 3rd edition])
    * Europa zonder Engeland – de noodzaak van een continentaal gevoel (C. Scarfoglio, 1940)
    * Grote verkondigers van het voortbestaan (K.H.E. de Jong, 1940)
    * Het voorspel tot den grooten strijd: de veldtocht in Noorwegen: wat onze vijanden meldden - en wat werkelijk gebeurde (dr. W.R.V. Picht, 1940)
    *
    Hoe zal deze oorlog eindigen?... ("J.F. Pasteur", 1940)
    * Hongersnood in Engeland / door Viscount Lymington; een samenvatting en een commentaar door Alan Sinclair Sidgwick (V. Lymington, pseudonym of Vernon Wallop Earl of Portsmouth, 1940)
    * Kan Engeland den oorlog winnen? De zeeoorlog en de neutralen (baron dr. L.F.W. Staël von Holstein, 1940) 
    * Mobilisatiedagboek 1939: dagboek van een soldaat uit de eerste mobilisatiedagen (J. van Eijk, around 1940)
    *
    Naar corporatieve bedrijfsorganisatie (J. Meijer Azn., Meijer Schwencke's father, 1941)
    * Oorlog in het Noorden (F. Lützow, 1940)
    * SOS Europa. Een bijdrage tot de schuldvraag van dezen oorlog (B.M. Roelli, 1940)
    * Tsjecho-Slowakije, slachtoffer der westersche mogendheden (E. Moravec, 1940, the third edition was entitled Wij zijn verraden - Tsjecho-Slowakije, slachtoffer der westersche mogendheden) [text]

  9. Fröhlich, p.344. [text]

  10. Van Berkel: Was bringt das Jahr 1940?. [text]

  11. Tenhaeff, p.214-215; Van Berkel: Oorlogsvoorspellingen - een onderzoek m.b.t. proscopie in verband met het wereldgebeuren (Den Haag, 1948 [1947]). [text]

  12. Van Berkel: Nostradamus De grootste ziener aller tijden (J. Vandervoort, Amsterdam, 1998). [text]

  13. Vos, p.25-26. [text]

  14. Vos, p.85-86. [text]

  15. Vos, p.25 [text]

  16. All these newspapers are published online on http://kranten-historisch.startpagina.nl. [text]

  17. De Jong, 4-II, p.643-644; Vos, p.80. In the thirties and the first years of World War II,, Meijer Schwencke was active in the national-socialist camp. It is not clear if he was a member of the NSB. In 1941, he joined the Dutch SS. In 1942, because of malversations, he no longer was on speaking terms with the Germans. In 1943, he worked for the illegal newspaper Het Parool. After the liberation of the Netherlands in 1945, he worked as an inspector of the Office of National Security (nowadays: the AIVD) until his arrest in 1946 (Groeneveld, p.85). [text]

  18. Vos, p.80. [text]

  19. De Jong, 4-II, p.642-644; Vos, p.81-89. [text]

  20. Rapport inzake Jan Campert, p.25-26 (http://www.denhaag.nl/pics/hga/pdf/251768_BW_inter.pdf). [text]

  21. Henri Theodorus Maria de Greeve SJ was born in Amsterdam on December 25, 1892 and died in Groesbeek on June 14, 1974. He was a renowned radio-speaker and publicist. In 1938, he founded the Bond Zonder Naam, an idealistic movement which promoted charity beyond the boundaries of religion or philosophy. The slogan of this movement was: improve the world by beginning to improve yourself. De Greeve explicitly turned himself against national-socialism and the NSB. From January 1941 until mid-1944, he was kept hostage in a.o. Haaren and St. Michielsgestel. During his captivity, he remained active. He held lectures for his companions in distress and wrote the theatre piece Het Vierde Beest, in which he exposed the ideology of national-socialism (see: GREEVE, Henri Theodorus Maria de (1892-1974)). [text]

  22. Van Berkel: The Prophecies of Nostradamus and Information on prof. mr. dr. Hendrik Houwens Post alias mr. dr. W.L. Vreede [text]

 

© Politischen Archiv Auswärtigen Amt, Berlin
In connection with this article, photocopies have been studied of the brochures Que se passera-t-il entre le printemps 1940 et le printemps 1941? (Geneva, 1940, on this website indicated with "Rossier"-1940b) and its Serbian pendant (Sta nam donosi 1940?, Belgrade, 1940, on this website indicated with "Belgrade"). 
The original documents are owned by the Politischen Archiv Auswärtigen Amt (ref: PA AA R 66658). 
Every copy, print, multiplification or other use of parts of the contents of these brochures, published on www.nostradamusresearch.org, requires a written permission of the Politischen Archiv Auswärtigen Amt, D-11013 Berlin.

 
 

 
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